deathlessness


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The Complete Works of Primo Levi, some 15 years in the making, testifies to that deathlessness.
Those seeking deathlessness actually facilitate their own demise.
Archer receives a blood transfusion and is raised from the dead just long enough to accuse Bertha of murderous designs on Latimer's life--Eagleton suggests that it is the very deathlessness of the narrative that betrays the particular (and particularly modern) "curse of omniscience" here "the epistemological circle of a bourgeois science which threatens to swallow the whole of Nature down its ravenous maw and so ends up knowing only its innards" (60).
in Greek tradition, deathlessness is usually a distinctive attribute of the Gods.
Frost, she says, "modifies the Emersonian dream of deathlessness or indeterminacy .
The Emperor forced thousands of scholars to search for "herbs of deathlessness.
Transhumanism has much in common with spiritual aspirations to transcend animal nature for deathlessness, superhuman abilities, and superior insight, though transhumanists pursue these goals through technology rather than (or at least not solely) through spiritual exercises.
The idea of deathlessness in cyberspace can be reassuring, especially during a time of extreme transition: Wait six months, the technology will be better; but wait six months, the world will be worse.
Silence is here associated with timelessness and immortality, with the condition of deathlessness.
The tree of life represents deathlessness which points Adam and Eve towards what they seek when conjoined by God, it was given at creation.
This is the cue for Krishna to begin his teaching about life and deathlessness, duty, nonattachment, the self, love, spiritual practice, and the inconceivable depths of reality," writes Mitchell in his introduction.
Deathlessness at second-hand felt deathless all the same.
Weaver's ceuvre is defined by its insistent iteration of the deathlessness of ancestral heritage amid the life cycle.
Thus, when Sappho describes Aphrodite as immortal ([LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) she tells the audience something that it already knows and so makes her deathlessness emphatic.
In "Dual Immortality: The Link between Birthlessness and Deathlessness in Science Fiction," Howard Hendrix argues that recent science fiction exhibits a comparable kind of alienation in its "denial of the sexual and generational" (189).