anxiety

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Synonyms for anxiety

Synonyms for anxiety

Synonyms for anxiety

(psychiatry) a relatively permanent state of worry and nervousness occurring in a variety of mental disorders, usually accompanied by compulsive behavior or attacks of panic

References in periodicals archive ?
Rehabilitation counselors-in-training: A study of levels of death anxiety and perceptions about client death.
Templer's (1970) 15-item Death Anxiety Scale (DAS) was used to measure level of verbalized death anxiety.
In aging, the origin of these factors is focused on death anxiety and the anxiety of lack of change and compensation in the life.
There are also a remarkable number of studies on death anxiety and anxiety at the end of life.
D = Despair; AH = Anger-Hostility; G = Guilt; SI = Social Isolation; LC = Loss of Control; R = Rumination; DP = Depersonalization; SM = Somatization; and DA = Death Anxiety.
People with higher self-esteem have lower death anxiety, according to this theory.
Afterlife constructs, death anxiety, and life reviewing: The importance of religion as a moderating variable.
Perhaps it was the battery death anxiety, and perhaps it was the infernal pocket digging, but the likeliest culprit of all is the fashion on display at retailers like Gideon's Fine Jewelry.
Death Anxiety Scale This 17-item self-report questionnaire assesses fear and anxiety around the act of dying and the finality of death using items such as "I am very much afraid to die" and "I often think about how short life really is" (Templer, 1970).
Coping with personal death: The extent that afterlife beliefs influence death anxiety and death depression.
The way that culture helps eliminate death anxiety is to convey to us a sense that we are actually valuable members of a meaningful Universe.
Once interpreted through Hebraic optics, the Babel narrative can be appreciated as a story wherein a loving Deity (father figure) acts according to the best interests of His children (the Multitude), facilitating their emotional maturity and psychological individuation and consequently providing the space to mobilize their death anxiety into a vitalizing, life-affirming sense of self.
Interestingly, participants with low self-esteem who received the brief touch reported less death anxiety on the questionnaire than those who had not been touched.
TABLE 3 Defensive Theology Scale and death anxiety ratings predicting Incarnational ambivalence Predictors: Beta Death Anxiety .