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  • verb

Words related to deaccession

sell (art works) from a collection, especially in order to raise money for the purchase of other art works

References in periodicals archive ?
Commentators have also recommended an arbitral review of deaccessioning decisions when the museum plans to sell the artwork and use the proceeds for operating costs.
Despite having benefited from others' deaccessioning, Mr Lewis almost never disposes himself.
The principal reason is that neither of the two main forms of deaccessioning, which may be defined as bottom-feeding and top-lopping, is a good idea.
Over the longer haul, they will have to set up criteria for separating their rare book sheep from their rare book goats, permanently deaccessioning a great many sheep, retaining a modest number of locally relevant goats.
But council leader David Mackintosh could not see the big issue: deaccessioning the statue would raise money for a new museum extension, after all, and Mackintosh took no notice of local, national or international opposition any more than he did to the complaints of Northampton's most celebrated living creative son.
See generally Daniel Range, Deaccessioning and Its Costs in
And this year, we have heard more about questionable deaccessioning than about strengthening collections: among the worst offenders are Northampton Borough Council, who belligerently sold an important Egyptian statue to fund a shoe museum, and Delaware Art Museum, who let go of William Holman Hunt's Isabella and the Pot of Basil for little more than half its low estimate at auction.
And it was a grassroots effort that ultimately combined funds from meticulous deaccessioning of other work by Eakins with those from more than thirty-five hundred donors from all fifty states.
Preservation planning and management must be integrated more strictly within all archival functions, including collection development, acquisition, appraisal, re-appraisal, and deaccessioning techniques.
Moreover, the sale highlights the disparity in the US between the ethical guidelines set out for deaccessioning art from museums and those for other non-profit cultural institutions, such as historic houses.
If cultural institutions no longer muster the same authority to curate collections--and by curate I mean shape them through the activities of acquisition, appraisal, description, deaccessioning, and all the other processes in which such institutions engage--what is their role within society and in regard to cultural heritage?
In accordance with its early history, moma has through the years engaged in a bolder program of deaccessioning than many of its fellow institutions, but the sale of works of art is nevertheless infrequent.
Back in New York, the deaccessioning by the Albright-Knox continues with the sale of the museum's African and Pre-Columbian sculpture at Sotheby's on 17 May.