daylight-saving time


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Synonyms for daylight-saving time

time during which clocks are set one hour ahead of local standard time

References in periodicals archive ?
Just ask the folks who woke up Sunday morning feeling they ought to set their clocks back -- only to be reminded by a friend, neighbor or the media that daylight-saving time was being extended one week beginning this year.
An ideal study of daylight-saving time would randomly allocate time schemes across regions, a difficult experiment to execute.
During the past several months companies such as Microsoft and Apple have created software patches to tell computers daylight-saving time starts on the second Sunday in March instead of the first Sunday in April and ends on the first Sunday in November instead of the last Sunday in October.
Typically, daylight-saving time began on the first Sunday in April and ended on the last Sunday in October.
In many cases, making the necessary changes to accommodate the new daylight-saving time schedule will be relatively minor.
A conference committee has scaled back a plan to extend daylight-saving time after several business groups protested the change.
To make the most of the time in bed, we recommend that older people go to bed early to pay back their debt or to make up for the hour on daylight-saving time.
The initiative to designate the three time zones, which was easily approved in the energy committee, also proposed the use of daylight-saving time from the beginning of April to the end of October.
Reversing a decision by his Orthodox predecessor, Sharansky, who is observant but not Orthodox, said that daylight-saving time will be extended by 37 days this year.
Daylight-saving time works by "making" the sun "set" one hour later, thus reducing the period between sunset and sun down by one hour.
That's when daylight-saving time kicks in -- a full three weeks earlier than usual.
Never fear, it was an act of government, not God, but thanks to the Energy Act of 2005, Congress up and added a month to daylight-saving time.
In a ruling certain to have national repercussions, Mexico's highest court (Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nacion, SCJN) threw out the federal government's directive requiring Mexico City to abide by the federally imposed daylight-saving time.
This Sunday marks the annual switch to daylight-saving time, and with it the need to set clocks ahead one hour.
TODAY marks the conjunction of two important events: It's the first regular working day since daylight-saving time ended at 2 a.