darner

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Related to darners: Libellulidae
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Words related to darner

a person who mends by darning

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Various local species, along with their cousins, the damselflies, have telling names like ebony jewel-wing, amber-winged spreadwing, red damsel, red bluet, orange bluet, violet dancer, spotted blue darner, sand dragon, calico pennant, blue pirate, green jacket, ruby meadowfly, goldenwing, and red saddlebag.
How else are you going to figure out that the bright red-and-brown striped dragonfly in your backyard is probably a variegated meadowhawk, or that the brilliant blue-and-brown one is more likely to be a blue-eyed darner than a Walker's darner.
During the course of its lifetime, a large darner can consume thousands of mosquitoes and other insects.
It's actually a sock darner and probably dates from the end of the Victorian period.
A healthy population of dragonfly nymphs will reward you by voraciously gobbling mosquito larvae; in one study of two larval black-tipped darners, each underwater hunter consumed more than 1,000 would-be mosquitoes before emerging as an aerial adult.
Darners are among our largest and most striking dragonflies.
Second, the removal of the infrastructure Darners that slow the exchange of data results in decreased planning, scheduling and processing times.
The material had to be sent to darners and then put through a finishing process before finally it was made into a kilt.
They have cool names such as darners or dashers, skimmers or gliders.
With this wisdom in mind, we report here the details of massive flights of migrating common green darners (Anax junius) and several other species at Chicago, Illinois (41[degrees]51[minutes]N, 87[degrees]38[minutes]W), on 14 September 1978, at Cape May, New Jersey (38[degrees]56[minutes]N, 74[degrees]57.
In addition, Broad Meadow Brook Sanctuary will be looking for perchers, skimmers, club tails, meadow hawks, darners and other dragon and damsel flies.
Darners will be out in the swamps, where cattails are almost always two or three feet tall.
Darners are our largest dragonflies, reaching over 3 inches in length.
Green darners can have bodies over three inches long and a wingspan up to about four inches across.
Damselflies are rare along the rivers now, and darners have left their ponds.