dark

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Synonyms for dark

Synonyms for dark

having little or no light

deficient in brightness

somewhat black

of a complexion tending toward brown or black

characterized by or expressive of a foreboding somberness

Synonyms

marked by little hopefulness

absence or deficiency of light

Synonyms for dark

absence of moral or spiritual values

an unilluminated area

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an unenlightened state

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devoid of or deficient in light or brightness

Antonyms

(used of color) having a dark hue

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brunet (used of hair or skin or eyes)

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stemming from evil characteristics or forces

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secret

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showing a brooding ill humor

lacking enlightenment or knowledge or culture

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marked by difficulty of style or expression

having skin rich in melanin pigments

not giving performances

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References in periodicals archive ?
Who never ate his bread in sorrow, who never spent the darksome hours, weeping and watching for the morrow, he knows ye not, you heavenly powers.
Mistaken blessing, which old age they call, 'Tis a long, nasty, darksome hospital, A ropey chain of rheums; a visage rough, Deformed, unfeatured, and a skin of buff .
Yet his work is dragged up out of that darksome well where the essential self cowers, in fear of the light'.
Unfortunately, that separation was sustained into the twentieth century, supported by grim and darksome images about the Draculean terrors beyond Transylvania--in the "East" and the region of the "Turks.
The individual can do nothing, and yet he can do everything," Albert Camus declares; the second part of his statement, however, is inconceivable for Kafka, for whom there are impassable walls that point to the suffocating power of his darksome perspective, or as Kafka writes in the diary entry dated September 30, 1915, "the innocent and the guilty [are] both executed without distinction in the end.
Hawthorne's sexual anxiety is made more evident in his addition that her 'familiarly attentive' companion (the Lord Mayor's brother in fact) has a 'monstrous portent of a beard' such that no mouth could be seen until he opened it to speak or eat, when 'you suddenly became aware of a cave, hidden behind the imperious and darksome shrubbery', and the suggestion that 'any child would have recognised them at a glance.
And for the darksome locks being undone, you know how much use poetry makes of negative words and just for the reason that they express an antithesis:
40) Again, only Cyril of Alexandria rivals the extremity of Calvin's criticism and the charge of willful dissimulation: "For being still sick of an harmful shame, he permits the faith that is in him to be not seen uncovered, but casting about it dissimulation like a darksome cloak, he as yet conceals that he is on Christ's side.