dandyism


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Related to dandyism: dandies
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Synonyms for dandyism

the manner and dress of a fop or dandy

References in periodicals archive ?
Garelick describes dandyism as "the artform of commodifying personality.
Decadentism distinguished itself by adding morbidity to this construct of dandyism.
Her designs are a result of considered and distinctive influences - 16th century Dutch Delft pottery as the inspiration for her 1996 Toile Print Boot, British colonialism reflected in the Sahara Plimsoll of 1999 and Victorian dandyism influencing the 1996 Trompe l'Oeil Boot.
Sanyal's analysis of the female appropriation of Baudelairean dandyism in Monsieur Venus includes a most perceptive understanding of shame as marking the emergence of a wounded subjectivity: "The experience of shame is akin to having the intimate lining of one's being turned inside out and exposed, while sensing that the forces outside of us are imprinted into our core" (153).
It is in this section that Hawkins asks the important question: "How is British pop dandyism framed by traditions that raise questions of subjectivity and spectacularity?
But Ralph's freedom seems questionable when he implicates Lieni as the driving force behind his dandyism.
Clothes today sometimes seem arbitrary and bizarre; nevertheless, the startling dandyism of the newly emancipated young reveals a kind of logic of whizzing entropy.
Moreover, Disraeli used his effeminate dandyism to create an oratorical style that won the ear of both election audiences and the House of Commons.
The evidence of his dandyism is provided both by his mode of address and accompanying gestures, rather than his dress itself.
Ziegler doesn't leave matters there of course--there's more to it than perverse dandyism.
Extracting the dandyism and occasional epigrams from Ouida's potboiling novels of falsetto masculinity, of hard fighting, hard riding aristocrats, Schaffer argues that Ouida's bestsellers were the founding documents of the aesthetic novel from Meredith and Wilde to Henry James: "Rereading Ouida's work reveals that the aesthetic novel largely derives from--of all places--popular women's writing.
Meynell, on the other hand, inhabited the female sphere so fully that her own personality faded away, and she thereby achieved the severe self-discipline, the complete subjection to one's public persona, that forms the climactic desire of dandyism.
Leben und Meinungen des Herrn Andreas von Balthesser (1907) offers a well-thought-out and amusingly presented philosophy of dandyism, indebted not only to Baudelaire but also to Nietzsche in conceiving the dandy as the acme of personal cultivation in contrast to the merely external, bookish character of modern 'Bildung'.
It is a bold step, but at the same time it is one facet of this unforgettable picture of dandyism driven towards insanity and dissolution.