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Related to dadaism: Impressionism
  • noun

Synonyms for dadaism

a nihilistic art movement (especially in painting) that flourished in Europe early in the 20th century

References in periodicals archive ?
Not only was Dadaism the first mash-up art form, it was characterized by collaboration across different disciplines and represented the ultimate in lateral thinking.
The cartoon characters Beavis and Butt-head are similar examples; they are the commercially kitsch dregs of adolescent Dadaism.
McLuhan's dictate embodies the conceptual ground of subversive movements like Dadaism and Pop-Art.
Modernism developed as Dadaism, surrealism, expressionism, constructivism, futurism, absurdism and symbolism in different parts of the West and Russia.
The film has the feel of a piece of Dadaism from the 1930s, or perhaps a decade earlier.
And yet unlike Dadaism, Surrealism was not simply a negation (anti-art) but a positive expression of the human subconscious.
It encompassed a broad range of styles, from realism and symbolism to pure abstraction, and a variety of anti-styles we associate with the legacy of Marcel Duchamp and Dadaism.
3) Flora further argues that the repeated references "tadada" refer not only to Dadaism but also to the end of T.
Then there was Dadaism, where everything assumed an infantile stance and where Marcel Duchamp canonised a lavatory bowl.
In his 1924 "Lecture on Dada," Tristan Tzara argued that Dadaism stemmed from a communal disgust for philosophers, pretentious artists, passion and "real pathological wickedness":
Female Dada: Until Pop Art came along and thumbed its collective nose at the '50s, Dadaism was considered the ultimate bad-boy art form.
Dadaism initially developed as an anti war attitude; artists were disgusted and chagrined by European society's inability to deal with contemporary problems.
How Nice To Be in England will be a mixture of the Rawlinson End performance, first premiered at the Unity in Liverpool back in 2010, and Neil's own set, merged together by the seven-piece Brainwashing House band and cantering through the 20th century and explaining movements like Dadaism and opposition to fascism along the way.
As the titles suggest, both of these books are bombs: explosive, violent, owing much to Surrealism (especially the Artaud kind) and Dadaism but propelling these movements forward, via catapult, into a very 21st-century Theater of the Absurd.