curandera


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  • noun

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a Mexican woman who practices healing techniques inherited from the Mayans

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References in periodicals archive ?
Led by curandera Elena Avila, participants were mostly conventional health care professionals desiring to expand their healing insights.
Shockingly she suddenly awoke from her coma, only to accurately predict the death of the ranch's curandera midwife and her own mentor, Maria Sonora or "La Huila.
All this is done with prayer, as she describes in her acclaimed book, Woman Who Glows in the Dark: A Curandera Reveals Traditional Aztec Secrets of Physical and Spiritual Health (Tarcher/Putnam).
One such place in the mountains is Huatla de Jimenez, birthplace of Maria Sabina, a curandera or healer who became famous in the 1960s for dispensing "magic" or hallucinogenic mushrooms, perhaps indiscriminately, to all who called at her humble hut.
Another friend who's Latina occasionally consults her curandera, and my Catholic aunt still trusts in the cures of shamans.
Trinidad, whose soul abandons her while she dreams, and Rafael, whose spirit cannot find rest since he died far from home, find themselves caught in a nowhere space between life and death until the old curandera finally released from their respective nightmares.
328) The one good American turns out to be a curandera, an Indian of sorts.
Miss Cozy is a matchmaker and curandera, the keeper of healing stories.
To learn more about the wider web of health care, I interviewed a sound healer, a medicine woman, a curandera.
One year later, she published Curandera, a collection of poems highly regarded by her peers for its presentation of literary code-switching.
The exhibition, titled " Juana Briones y Su California: Pionera, Fundadora, Curandera," will focus on the life and times of Juana Briones (1802-1889)-pioneer, founder, healer-possibly San Francisco's first resident (when it was Yerba Buena) and one of the most important women in California in the mid-to-late 1800s.
Castellanoz is also a curandera, or healer, treating friends and strangers alike in Nyssa with herbs and other traditional remedies.
Ana, a plump, middle-aged Mexican curandera (healer), wore a housedress and oversized glasses and led me into her private chapel, or capilla, which was adjacent to her house.
After a full day of workshops, the dinner program hosted Elena Avila, RN, Curandera and Author of Woman who Glows in the Dark.
My Abuelita was a granny healer, a curandera (one who cures) to her own, a tribute to women's wisdom and empowerment over their family's state of health.