criticize

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Related to criticizing: critiquing
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Synonyms for criticize

find fault with

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Synonyms for criticize

to find fault with

to write a critical report on

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Synonyms for criticize

References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike previous threats, I now face much more intense and organized threats for criticizing the government.
The survey concluded that fear of criticizing the government publicly is what makes a large number of people prefer private circumstances for questioning the authorities, the daily stated.
Tom Schuck is the lawyer defending pro-family activist Bill Whatcott, who is appealing his conviction for criticizing homosexual behaviour.
The Anchorage Daily News penned an editorial criticizing the congressional appropriations, which were doled out in chunks in 2004.
Faced with Jesus' warning "Judge not lest you be judged," Midgley insists that Jesus is not taking aim at our moral faculty of judgment but instead criticizing vindictiveness.
In criticizing our discussion, they tried to minimize the enhanced effect on decreased litter size at the low end of the dose range, a response that does not follow the classical linear dose-response relationship.
Narrowly re-elected in 2002, this European leader gained popularity with voters after criticizing the U.
Criticizing legal precedent barring government intrusion into Americans' private lives, the Pennsylvania Republican blasted the Supreme Court for a line of decisions about birth control, abortion and other issues dating back to 1965.
A: Editorial cartooning is a negative art form: criticizing, satirizing, making fun of authority.
What, ultimately, is the point of criticizing NAS for being a mainstream education organization?
Early juries, during the 1980s, welcomed such projects, while ruthlessly criticizing entries that consisted merely of reports of the participation processes of housing committees.
He said the church they were criticizing "bears very little resemblance to the church we actually know, which is alive and well and faithful.
Here Rorty fleshes out his moral perspective by criticizing appeals to "Reason" to justify our moral intuitions.
The ad was a classic example of speech protected by the First Amendment, but it violated a federal campaign-finance law, which effectively barred such expenditures on the ground that they could influence the upcoming Presidential election by criticizing President Nixon and applauding one of his possible opponents, Senator McGovern.