credulously


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Related to credulously: incredulously
  • adv

Synonyms for credulously

in a credulous manner

References in periodicals archive ?
Goldsmith credulously labels the detainees remaining in Guantanamo (numbering 166 by this writing) as "terrorist soldiers," when the overwhelming majority are neither terrorists nor soldiers.
A common item was Seumas MacManus's romantic nationalist The Story of the Irish Race (1921), which asserted credulously that Fionn mac Cumhaill was an historical personage of the third century.
Dillon and Cannon were both clearly charmed by Lerach, sometimes to the point of repeating a little too credulously his version of events.
He's the Lib Dem leader," I respond incredulously--or credulously as it turns out.
This reductionist dissection of knowledge and experience which has been credulously borrowed from the methodology of natural sciences is most conspicuously manifested in the field of modern medicine.
Other news organizations have also come under fire for reporting too credulously on Iran, raising the question of whether the media learned anything from their poor performance before the Iraq war.
But its dishonest denials of the fact -- credulously believed by some and disingenuously accepted by others -- have helped stave off international action against it.
But while the case of Francesco Spiera is employed as a warning of the almost magical power of religious utterances, Doctor Faustus is a cautionary tale against credulously trusting that speech acts do have a supernatural power.
Caplan's concept would have helped clarify Weissberg's findings, which show that people seem to credulously accept the endless possibilities of government goodies, believing they will all deliver exactly the benefits they promise.
She is soon taken away from the battleground, with an excuse she credulously believes, and is relegated to the background of the scene of the final military offense.
Peter Costello, the Treasurer, who has a record of credulously adopting Treasury and Australian Tax Office advice and whose public statements have often proved to be misleading.
If we accept the proposition that affirmative action is subject to strict scrutiny because of its potential harm to minorities, we credulously imagine that Adarand stands for something like the following principle: Even when "benignly" intended, state action is properly subject to strict scrutiny if it poses a very substantial risk of fostering racist stereotypes or otherwise causing significant harms to racial minorities.