creature

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Related to creatureliness: creaturely
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References in periodicals archive ?
What is specific to man's creatureliness lies in the fact that he, unlike a crystal, a tree or an animal, can say "I myself.
Despite an ecological awakening, an inaccessible sense of creatureliness saps faith and justice.
It can remind me of my creatureliness and finitude, of the fragile, ephemeral nature of my existence, of my own neediness and the vulnerability of others.
Hence in anthropological materialism, political materialism and physical creatureliness are densely intertwined.
They are theological anthropology and symbolic theology: a taking stock of how science and culture inform and distort theological understandings of our creatureliness, and a common, constructive theology arising from our binding creeds and confessions.
This freedom grows not from a religiosity that intends to expand the limits of human self-realization, but from the responsible affirmation of our finite existence and our creatureliness.
12) If anything, the sexual bodies that we inhabit, that we love and care for in their finite creatureliness, are not understandable apart from their theological determinations, which need not, in the end, be ontotheological in any sense, though what this looks like, or should appear to us as such, remains unclear indeed.
Goldenberg, Tom Pyszczynski & David Weise, Disgust, Creatureliness and the Accessibility of Death-Related Thoughts, 37 EVR.
Mindful of the spirit, Byrd is also acutely aware of his creatureliness and its requirements for physical experiences of beauty and love.
It is pregnant with our complete conversion; for it announces the transformation of our creatureliness into freedom.
Dit is, volgens haar, juis die vrees wat dreig om die dekadente en estete van die fin de siecle te oorweldig: "The manifest subjection of women to the biological processes reminds man of his own creatureliness, of his own biological origin and therefore his own, no less biological death" (De Beauvoir 1989: 190).
For many of us, it is difficult to imagine how we might be imitators of Noah as the one who leads us into true creatureliness.
This is why we need to recover an understanding of Christian practice and discipleship as a "schooling in the ways of creatureliness," where we learn "that courtesy to creatures in which reverence for the Creator finds expression" (Lash, "Creation" 173).
In fact, Sutter lives as an autonomous man who rejects creatureliness under God, refuses to acknowledge sin, and refuses "life in the spirit.