cowardice


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I did not slink away through cowardice, but through an unbounded vanity.
That the contrary of a good is an evil is shown by induction: the contrary of health is disease, of courage, cowardice, and so on.
This done, emboldened by what they considered cowardice on the part of the white men, they neglected their usual mode of bush-fighting, and advanced openly within twenty paces of the willows.
Stuart ordered that they should be deprived of their arms, their under garments taken off, and that a piece of cloth should be tied round their waists, in imitation of a squaw; an Indian punishment for cowardice.
It was then, however, that the Prince Prospero, maddening with rage and the shame of his own momentary cowardice, rushed hurriedly through the six chambers, while none followed him on account of a deadly terror that had seized upon all.
During the first period of his service, hard as he tried and much as he reproached himself with cowardice, he had not been able to do this, but with time it had come of itself.
There it is even now, and if any doubt it let them go thither and there they will find it and know the cowardice of their jeddak.
From the first the Russian had exhibited every trait of his true character--selfishness, boorishness, arrogance, cowardice, and lust.
you're dismissed, sir, for incompetence and cowardice, and if you're not off the premises in three minutes it'll be the worse for you
We were not fighters like them; we were cunning and cowardly, and it was because of our cunning and cowardice, and our inordinate capacity for fear, that we survived in that frightfully hostile environment of the Younger World.
On hearing this the Lion groaned and lamented very much and, reproaching himself with his cowardice, wished that he might die.
Shed down a kindly ray from above upon my life, and strength of war, that I may be able to drive away bitter cowardice from my head and crush down the deceitful impulses of my soul.
Aristotle, in his Politics, doth them, I believe, more justice, when he says, "The modesty and fortitude of men differ from those virtues in women; for the fortitude which becomes a woman, would be cowardice in a man; and the modesty which becomes a man, would be pertness in a woman.
It was also serious, for I learned that he was capable of using it, that under all his cowardice there was a courage of cowardice, like mine, that would impel him to do the very thing his whole nature protested against doing and was afraid of doing.
It is cowardice that holdeth them fast to their branches.