courtesan


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Synonyms for courtesan

Synonyms for courtesan

Synonyms for courtesan

a woman who cohabits with an important man

References in periodicals archive ?
And, somewhat appropriately, Courtesan, battling winner of the six-furlong nursery, is owned by Tony Fawcett, who sponsors Pontefract's leading trainer and jockey awards through his Studford Leisure company.
Yun Zhu, however, excluded the poems of courtesans from her compilation, due to the influence of Qing morality which shunned courtesans, reversing a seventeenth-century trend where highly-ranked and talented courtesans were accorded social respectability.
The Shanghai courtesan was at the heart of the rise of entertainment culture, the character around whom plots revolved in late-Qing fiction, the public figure in illustrated magazines, the celebrated civic attraction in newspapers, the hostess at dinner parties.
Men ruined themselves in desperate attempts to gain and retain a courtesan's favours, but a courtesan was always courted for far more than sex.
Ironically Jeanne Antoinette Poisson was by birth middle-class and was bred to be a courtesan through the usual medium, the stage.
For instance, a rich merchant, Yang Gengguang, married a courtesan in 1935.
The ballet begins with the young bourgeois Armand Duval as he storms into the apartment of his dead lover and former courtesan Marguerite Gautier.
One hundred and fifty years later, notorious courtesan Lavinia Flyte hears the maids at Ashdown House whisper of a hidden treasure, and bears witness as her protector Lord Evershot (desperate to find it) burns the building to the ground.
The complicated plot deals with the courtesan Proserpine, who is secretly in love with the young aristocrat Sabatino.
Courtesan and Countess: The Lost and Found Memoirs of the French Consul's Wife
Eugenio L Giusti, The Renaissance Courtesan in Words, Letters and Images: Social Amphibology and Moral Framing (A Diachronic Perspective), LED: Milan, 2014; 96 pp.
ORIENTAL drama is on offer in Calderdale with Diao Chan: The Rise of the Courtesan, often referred to as the Chinese Macbeth.
The Green Houses referred to the courtesan houses in Edo and the book depicted them in all four seasons (illustration 3).
The legal acts don't leave space for courtesan use.
In the introduction (11-14) Giusti considers the example of Veronica Franco and this Venetian courtesan's ability to cross social boundaries, or what he calls her amphibological skill, as an asset of Renaissance courtesans.