courier


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Related to courier: DHL, FedEx
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  • noun

Synonyms for courier

Synonyms for courier

a person who carries messages or is sent on errands

Synonyms for courier

References in classic literature ?
He beheld the courier still standing slightly astride in the centre of the grassy ring, his hands in his pockets; and his lean, ironical Italian face seemed to grow longer and longer in the evening light.
I call myself Montano," cried the strange courier in a voice equally loud and full.
He seems to me much more inexplicable as a brigand even than he was as a courier.
As four of you left the room, you and Miss Harrogate went ahead, talking and laughing; the banker and the courier came behind, speaking sparely and rather low.
Eugenio's a splendid courier, but he can't make much impression on Randolph
The courier looked for a moment at Winterbourne--the latter thought he was smiling--and then, solemnly, with a bow, "As mademoiselle pleases
Ah, happily," said Winterbourne, "the courier stayed at home.
He waited for her in the large hall of the hotel, where the couriers, the servants, the foreign tourists, were lounging about and staring.
I shut the windows at supper-time so as not to hear the sounds or the arrival of couriers.
They had arrived with the carriage and courier at the Erbprinz Hotel, the best of the town, and the whole party dined at the table d'hote.
There may have been a score of Englishmen in the house, but at the burst of that beloved and well-known music, every one of them, we young fellows in the stalls, Sir John and Lady Bullminster (who had taken a house at Pumpernickel for the education of their nine children), the fat gentleman with the mustachios, the long Major in white duck trousers, and the lady with the little boy upon whom he was so sweet, even Kirsch, the courier in the gallery, stood bolt upright in their places and proclaimed themselves to be members of the dear old British nation.
All the couriers, when they had done plunging about the ship and had settled their various masters in the cabins or on the deck, congregated together and began to chatter and smoke; the Hebrew gentlemen joining them and looking at the carriages.
Shortly afterwards, the courier announced that the valet, and the footman, and the two maids, and the four guides, and the fourteen mules, were in readiness; so the breakfast party went out to the convent door to join the cavalcade.
Wherever they went, their importance preceded them in the person of the courier riding before, to see that the rooms of state were ready.
The Innkeeper, hat in hand in the yard, swore to the courier that he was blighted, that he was desolated, that he was profoundly afflicted, that he was the most miserable and unfortunate of beasts, that he had the head of a wooden pig.