coterie

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  • noun

Synonyms for coterie

Synonyms for coterie

a particular social group

Synonyms for coterie

References in periodicals archive ?
Nodes holding replicas of the same data are represented logically into a tree structure, called Coterie.
A coterie represents a set of copies of the replicated data.
An elementary permutation of the coterie is performed to obtain a new less loaded coterie.
To handle this problem, when a Read/ write request is addressed, our load balancing strategy is invoked and the Coterie is restructured in order to reduce the load of the coterie and the communication cost of the quorum when the Read/Write request is achieved.
In figure 1, three versions are defined for each node of the coterie.
In the following examples, a coterie of a data D with 3 versions is represented with 7 nodes A, B, C, D, E, F and G having respectively the state occupied, free, blocked, free, blocked, blocked and free.
The corresponding coterie of the data D is contacted.
Shaw's single-author study is at once metacritical and revisionist: It is as much about the idea of the author as about O'Hara and his work, and it expands the notion of coterie to include personal affiliations, social networks, and multi-authored projects.
Beyond this, there is also a third register of names: public figures of an imagined coterie one doesn't know directly, including stars (Lana Turner), painters (Picasso), composers (Rachmaninoff), and poets (Mayakovsky).
It is at this point that both the strengths and the limits of coterie emerge.
If O'Hara's coterie begins with his circle of friends and influences, it more importantly ends up producing an open-ended series of meanings to be read between language and biography, form and context.
Bearing garish titles like "The Pastors are Cannibals of the Most Abominable Sort," Kierkegaard attacked all remaining vestiges of the coteries of culture, in effect sacrificing himself for the common man.
La Puce as group performance suggests several ways that literary critics of the Renaissance can move toward a broader cultural history: by looking at cities and coteries, at social and linguistic environments, rather than focusing on isolated authors assumed to have been preserved through uniformly appreciative readings.
Lynn Hunt remarks of Chartier, "His focus on the triangular relationship between the text as conceived by the author, as printed by the publisher, and as read (or heard) by the reader throws into doubt some of the canonical conceptions of the history of culture," and other critics have argued similarly that coterie writing, a central mode of early modern literary practice, calls into question traditional interpretations centered on single authors and print rather than manuscript circuits.
Coterie will develop a line of products and create new licensing opportunities that broaden exposure to scrapbooking and crafting in the marketplace.