corporatism


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  • noun

Words related to corporatism

control of a state or organization by large interest groups

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References in periodicals archive ?
Lastly, Phelps observes a disturbing increase in corporatism between the state and business, that is, a "parallel economy" of political influencers seeking company advantage and actively repressing market competition and innovation.
Corporatism as we experience it, in Phelps' telling, owes more to the continental European intellectual strands that came together in Benito Mussolini's syndicalism.
Along the same lines, Nader in Unstoppable repeatedly praises the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) as a scrappy opponent of corporatism.
Despite its formal rejection in many countries, however, corporatism made a surprising comeback in the 1990s in the form of 'lean corporatism', 'concerted action', 'competitive corporatism' and 'social partnership' (Rhodes, 2001; Compston 2002; Traxler, 2004; Avdagic, Rhodes and Visser, 2011).
Corporatism revealed itself recently in a small tuft of wheat that wouldn't die.
Corporatism has gained a firm grasp on America as we know it.
But the bitter fact is that this act of parliament, whose symbolism confirms that corporatism is in full force, ends an "era of hope" for transparency and accountability.
Erne's analysis of wage bargaining begins with the downward pressure on wages caused by the introduction of Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and the subsequent rise of competitive corporatism in the 1990s (including the increasing acceptance of wage concessions by workers).
A campaigner against Olympics corporatism, he said: "If the Olympic experience means anything, give them away to schoolchildren.
What is undeniable in the Middle East is the gradual demise of an entire mode of legitimacy, one born in the 1950s and 1960s -- a legitimacy that relied on the ancient discourse of radical and exclusive Arab nationalism, on verbal steadfastness and struggle against imperialism and Western pro-Israeli sentiment, on a blend of centralized socialism, corporatism and crony-capitalism, and on a power structure captured and monopolized by putschist militaries and their epigones.
This system, however, is not capitalism, but rather an economic order that harks back to Bismarck in the late nineteenth century and Mussolini in the twentieth: corporatism.
Rothbard speaks of both "American state corporatism" (1972, 111) and "liberal corporatism" (1965 [2000], 43), the latter distinguishing the American system from the much more oppressive Italian corporatism.
5 Regulation: More Competition, More State, a Different Corporatism
The line is blurry between activism and corporatism.