corporate


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to corporate: cooperate
  • adj

Synonyms for corporate

Synonyms for corporate

possessing or existing in bodily form

done by or characteristic of individuals acting together

Synonyms

Related Words

organized and maintained as a legal corporation

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
1971, the National Employee Savings and Trust Equity Guarantee bill) that would require the Chief Executive Officer of corporations to sign the corporate tax return.
consumers were found to value corporate economic responsibilities, whereas French and German consumers are more concerned about businesses conforming to legal and ethical standards.
Often, the link between the agenda of conservative think tanks and corporate interests is sporadic, tied to specific policies and projects.
And the corporate critics, particularly my academic friends, are far from appeased.
Whatever their cause, corporate restructurings have resulted in an unprecedented retirement of outstanding equity shares, which far outstripped the moderate level of new equity issuance (chart 2).
It's too early to weigh the ultimate impact of these trends in corporate ownership in terms of our capital markets and our corporate competitiveness.
When asking if Section 530 applied to all corporate officers, you also asked how Rev.
This focus is shown by increased percentages of corporate budgets allocated to internal communication and increased teaming and information sharing across positions.
Business entities generally organize in the corporate form in order to provide limited liability to shareholders, officers, directors, and employees.
Corporate boards must evaluate individual directors' performance and replac those who are ineffective.
At Any Cost: Corporate Greed, Women, and the Dalkon Shield.
These rules were designed to reduce a corporate borrower's interest deductions on certain debt; Congress concluded that a portion of the return on high-yield OID obligations was similar to a nondeductible distribution of corporate earnings with respect to equity.
This seemingly contradictory development, however, can be explained by the fact that, in Japan, corporate demand for funds has actually turned negative since 1998.
Castellani, Business Roundtable president, to discuss the group's approach to the widespread changes in corporate governance following the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and how the accounting profession can work more closely with the organization to bring about improvements.