References in classic literature ?
Nobody could touch the body until the coroner came.
Both you and the coroner have been at some pains," said he, "to single out the very strongest points in the young man's favour.
And about his quarrel with his father, I am sure that the reason why he would not speak about it to the coroner was because I was concerned in it.
The coroner frequents more public-houses than any man alive.
It is considered not unlikely that he will get up an imitation of the coroner and make it the principal feature of the Harmonic Meeting in the evenlng.
The beadle is very careful that two gentlemen not very neat about the cuffs and buttons (for whose accommodation he has provided a special little table near the coroner in the Harmonic Meeting Room) should see all that is to be seen.
Who is often almost as ignorant as the coroner himself," said Lydgate.
Chichely was his Majesty's coroner, and ended innocently with the question, "Don't you agree with me, Dr.
Yes, yes, give me a coroner who is a good coursing man," said Mr.
So the question of the tonic was finally abandoned, and the Coroner proceeded with his task.
I understand," continued the Coroner deliberately, "that you were sitting reading on the bench just outside the long window of the boudoir.
The examination was over, though I doubted if the Coroner was entirely satisfied with it.
These precautions enabled the coroner and jury to settle the question of identity, and to confirm the correctness of the servant's assertion; the evidence offered by competent witnesses, and by the discovery of certain facts, being subsequently strengthened by an examination of the dead man's watch.
But the coroner seemed to take it for granted, naturally enough, that I, as a total stranger in the neighbourhood, and a total stranger to Sir Percival Glyde, could not be in a position to offer any evidence on these two points.
I did not feel called on to volunteer any statement of my own private convictions, in the first place, because my doing so could serve no practical purpose, now that all proof in support of any surmises of mine was burnt with the burnt register; in the second place, because I could not have intelligibly stated my opinion--my unsupported opinion--without disclosing the whole story of the conspiracy, and producing beyond a doubt the same unsatisfactory effect an the mind of the coroner and the jury, which I had already produced on the mind of Mr.