cork

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Synonyms for cork

something used to fill a hole, space, or container

to plug up something, as a hole, space, or container

Synonyms for cork

outer bark of the cork oak

(botany) outer tissue of bark

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a port city in southern Ireland

the plug in the mouth of a bottle (especially a wine bottle)

a small float usually made of cork

close a bottle with a cork

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stuff with cork

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References in periodicals archive ?
Jordan explains, "If a dozen wines under cork are cellared for, say, two years and then tasted, there will be quite a variation between the bottles because some may be tainted but others will be advanced in their aging, because there has been some ingression of oxygen.
For wine drinkers, faulty corks lead to frustration and annoyance far too often.
The black stork, black vulture, and endangered Spanish imperial eagle, of which only 130 pairs remain worldwide, are among the 42 species of birds that depend on the cork woodlands.
A good part of the book's fascination is simply why a man would go from being one of President Clinton's speechwriters to an unemployed college graduate building a boat out of champagne corks in a borrowed garage.
While 82 per cent of winemakers who took part in a 2003 survey carried out by Wine Business Monthly said they still used natural cork, 28 per cent were using some form of synthetic closure for at least some of their wines.
However, there will always be a place for natural corks, especially in wines that are sparkling,' he said.
FOR some people the pop of the cork is part and parcel of the pleasure of wine drinking.
Currently, 90 wines in the Waitrose range use synthetic cork closures compared with 63 screwcaps and 600 natural corks.
But the real cork people are fighting back saying that real cork is irreplaceable and that it has been used for centuries.
To tell you the truth, I've never been one for cork sniffing.
Cork now has a fight on its hands for the first time since the legendary discovery that the unique bark was flexible, yet impervious to water and air.
At the end of the 19th century these corks were still made by hand.
At least four companies are injection molding and extruding foamed plastic wine corks, filing numerous patents and lawsuits as they contend for position in technology and in the marketplace.
After sensorial and technical analysis of 11,000 treated corks, researchers found that taint levels were practically nonexistent with the new technique.
These top-quality corks can sell for as much as a dollar apiece.