cork

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Synonyms for cork

something used to fill a hole, space, or container

to plug up something, as a hole, space, or container

Synonyms for cork

outer bark of the cork oak

(botany) outer tissue of bark

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a port city in southern Ireland

the plug in the mouth of a bottle (especially a wine bottle)

a small float usually made of cork

close a bottle with a cork

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Antonyms

stuff with cork

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References in classic literature ?
replied my aunt, pulling the cotton out of one ear like a cork.
Sancho likewise held his peace and ate acorns, and paid repeated visits to the second wine-skin, which they had hung up on a cork tree to keep the wine cool.
M'Dougal pretended to be convinced by their reasoning, and assured them that, so long as the white people should be unmolested, and the conduct of their Indian neighbors friendly and hospitable, the phial of wrath should remain sealed up; but, on the least hostility, the fatal cork should be drawn.
If you will examine the top of the cork, you will observe that the screw was driven in three times before the cork was extracted.
I never drew the cork till six months afterward, in a lonely camp, where, without anaesthetics, a doctor was compelled to operate on a man.
Kilcolman Castle was sacked and burned, and Spenser fled with his wife and children to Cork, homeless and wellnigh ruined.
The friend of the anchorite is always the third one: the third one is the cork which preventeth the conversation of the two sinking into the depth.
Glorvina, a very handsome, fresh-coloured, black-haired, blue-eyed young lady, who could ride a horse, or play a sonata with any girl out of the County Cork, seemed to be the very person destined to insure Dobbin's happiness--much more than that poor good little weak-spur'ted Amelia, about whom he used to take on so.
She had had a season in Dublin, and who knows how many in Cork, Killarney, and Mallow?
Answering the English nurse that she was quite well, and that she was going to the country tomorrow, Anna sat down by the little girl and began spinning the cork to show her.
Bounderby, putting his hands in his pockets, and assuring himself with his right hand that the cork of the little bottle was ready for use, 'I have no occasion to say to you, that you are not only a lady born and bred, but a devilish sensible woman.
said the nurse, picking up the cork of the green bottle, which had fallen out on the pillow, as she stooped to take up the child.
With the cork undrawn,' he added, emphatically, looking at her father.
The visitor first held the bottle against the light of the candle, and next examined the top of the cork.
Dissatisfied with the pacific aspect of a face which had no more than the faintest hint of flaxen eyebrow, together with a pair of amiable blue-gray eyes and round pink cheeks that refused to look formidable, let him frown as he would before the looking-glass (Philip had once told him of a man who had a horseshoe frown, and Tom had tried with all his frowning might to make a horseshoe on his forehead), he had had recourse to that unfailing source of the terrible, burnt cork, and had made himself a pair of black eyebrows that met in a satisfactory manner over his nose, and were matched by a less carefully adjusted blackness about the chin.