cordiform


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  • adj

Synonyms for cordiform

(of a leaf) shaped like a heart

References in periodicals archive ?
Black abdomen with golden cordiform area on central dorsal region corresponding to the urticating hair patch (Fig.
As such, the fool's cap map from Antwerp is an exemplary illustration of Calvinist aesthetics, since it places a beautiful cordiform representation of the world in the head of a madman, emblematizing the contradiction between humanity's moral depravity and the beauty of God's creation.
The fossil is most similar to Neviusia cliftonii from Mount Shasta based on o vate to cordiform leaves with coarsely-toothed margins.
Eric Jager's premiss is that, since ancient times, the book has functioned as a metaphor for the self; and that, since the Middle Ages situated selfhood in the heart, so the heart can be seen as a book in which the truth about an individual can be read; and further, in the Middle Ages the metaphor took on tangible form in the shape of cordiform codices and other depictions of the metaphorical heart.
There are, however, a substantial number of intensively patinated, curvilinear designs, capped with mushroom-shaped or cordiform protuberances, that appear to date from another epoch.
Cartographers of Dieppe map out the coastlines of Canada, the Caribbean Islands, and Brazil; Oronce Fine registers the fruits of Verrazano's voyages under Francis I in his cordiform world-map of 1534 (illustrated in Albert Ronsin's article on the teaching of geography at Saint-Die-des-Vosges at the beginning of the sixteenth century, in Lestringant, 64).
inaequale were symmetrically cordiform with two fully developed wings, a dense cover of rhizoids, and a single well-developed meristem (Fig.