cooperate

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  • verb

Synonyms for cooperate

work together

Synonyms

help

Synonyms

Synonyms for cooperate

to work together toward a common end

Synonyms

Synonyms for cooperate

work together on a common enterprise of project

References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, July 6 ( ANI ): When deciding whether to cooperate with others, people do not act thinking in their own reward, as had been previously believed, but rather individuals are more influenced by their own mood at the time and by the number of individuals with whom they have cooperated before, a new study has revealed.
Understanding why we do one thing or another can help in designing incentives that induce people to cooperate," the authors of the research pointed out.
The experiment revealed that people are not going to cooperate more because of being organized in a certain way.
A typical deferred prosecution agreement might include an indictment of the company, a requirement that it admit guilt, a large fine and/or restitution to victims (usually shareholders), some form of external monitoring and agree to cooperate in the prosecution of responsible individuals.
Indeed, the company may cooperate to prosecute you.
In the same issue of Nature, researchers highlight another set of interactions, called the snowdrift game, in which players have incentives both to cooperate and to exploit each other.
The commission's order to Parks instructs him, the LAPD command staff and officers to cooperate with the District Attorney's Office.
We clearly understand the need and necessity and we have always and will continue to always cooperate with every prosecuting agency,'' Parks said.
Washington, Sept 23 (ANI): A new research has revealed that men and women cooperate equally, particularly in situations involving a dilemma that pits the interests of an individual against that of a group.
The research also claims that men cooperate better with each other as compared to women cooperating with each other, and that women tend to cooperate more than men when interacting with the opposite-sex.
Nowak and Sigmund applied Pavlov and other tactics to the "prisoner's dilemma;' in which two players can either cooperate or act selfishly A player receives the most points for acting selfishly when the other cooperates, slightly fewer points if both cooperate, fewer still in cases of dual selfishness, and no points for cooperating when the other acts selfishly
In this game, a Pavlov player cooperates only if both participants chose the same alternative - either cooperating or not - in their prior encounter.
Another court likewise ruled a confession involuntary when an investigator told a suspect three times that he could either have an attorney present during questioning or cooperate with the Government, but not both.
New York,(15) the suspect's friend, a police academy recruit, told the suspect that the officer would lose his new job if the suspect failed to cooperate.
This brand of cooperation, known as reciprocal altruism, prevails when some individuals forgo constant selfishness for a "tit-for-tat" tactic, in which they cooperate with a colleague on a first encounter, and on subsequent occasions do whatever their cohort did on the previous encounter.