contumacy


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Synonyms for contumacy

the disposition boldly to defy or resist authority or an opposing force

Words related to contumacy

willful refusal to appear before a court or comply with a court order

obstinate rebelliousness and insubordination

References in periodicals archive ?
And withall, he must publishe sharpe penall statutes against all such, as shall with disloyal contumacy violate and transgresse the same.
Hecht's garrulity and contumacy guaranteed that he would not resist the call to battle at the Barbary Coast, but the extent of his passion exceeded the depth of his commitment.
Defrocking," Archdeacon Huskins said, "almost always only happens on moral grounds, or contumacy.
Had this been true, Naboth would have been accused of contumacy for unjustly refusing to pay his debt.
given over to "freakish caprices," contumacy and selfishness, that is, a prime candidate for the law of karmic retribution.
Christianity openly taught a doctrine that diminished men's respect and awe of the particular law of their earthly city; it exposed to the multitude the merely provisional character of human law and thereby sowed the seeds of public contumacy.
34) In addition, murderers who fled the city could be accused of the crime and then, if they failed to respond to a series of summonses, be charged for contumacy.
The writ of error, like the appeal, only brings the record before the court; and if the citation be disregarded, the non-appearance of the party is not considered as a default or contumacy.
Perhaps their reading merely reflects their own bias; "and then all this stubbornness and contumacy towards the King and his laws, is nothing but pride of heart and ambition, or else imposture" (ibid.
His criticism is in contumacy to the ideals upon which the whole structure rests.
Major excommunication retained "only a rather artificial link to sin" and was used only to punish contumacy, that is, continued resistance to Church authority.