controvert

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Related to controverts: controversially, disputing
  • verb

Synonyms for controvert

to refuse to admit the truth, reality, value, or worth of

Synonyms for controvert

prove to be false or incorrect

Synonyms

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References in periodicals archive ?
However, when a defense expert's testimony of alternative causation theories controverts an element of the plaintiff's prima facie case, where the plaintiff bears the burden of proof, rebuttal testimony by a nurse need not be stated to a reasonable degree of medical probability.
I relay this little story because it so tellingly controverts the rather cartoonish image of the "neurotic" Ludwig that emerges from Alexander Waugh's absorbing, highly readable, but reductive portrait of the Wittgenstein family--A Family at War, as Waugh, himself a member of a famous and controversial literary family, calls it.
The key to beating the defense medical examiner (DME) on substantive issues is finding evidence that either controverts his or her opinions or shows that it is tainted by antiplaintiff bias.
We are lucky, then, to now have available a comprehensive selection of Mangan's prose that not only controverts Joyce's haughty criticism, but also shows Mangan's prose stylings to be very much in the tradition of ingenious parody, punning, wordplay, and political irony that Joyce's own work so epitomizes.
One choice controverts the evidence; the other does not.
John Gallagher, stated "We have struggled to work with the FDA to find a compromise, beyond that required by law, to import these drugs whose authenticity and quality is not contested; the FDA offers no solutions, only an FDA policy that controverts both statute and regulation, and whose transparent goal is to allow the continued overcharge of sick Americans to the direct benefit of Big Pharma.
In the end, the writer-hero disavows and controverts his initial high (human) principles and succumbs to the mob hysteria and hyperbolic manipulation.
This argument controverts the conventional understanding of Protestant typology in which the Old Testament biblical type is both a sign pointing to its fulfillment in the New Testament, and also a thing signified and therefore endowed with historicity.
The 25th section of the judiciary act of 1789, in express terms comprehends the case; and this writer himself, in one of his subsequent Numbers, forgetting this rash assertion in the first, admits that it does confer the jurisdiction he controverts.