contingent

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Synonyms for contingent

Synonyms for contingent

having a chance of happening or being true

determined or to be determined by someone or something else

Synonyms for contingent

a gathering of persons representative of some larger group

Related Words

possible but not certain to occur

Related Words

determined by conditions or circumstances that follow

uncertain because of uncontrollable circumstances

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References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, the use of contingents is increasing in Europe and elsewhere.
People work as contingents for a variety of reasons.
People also work as contingents after they have retired from a full-time job in order to earn additional income and to improve or update skills (Caudron, 1994a; Kirkpatrick, 1988; Phillion & Brugger, 1994).
In still other cases, people work as contingents hoping eventually to be hired as core workers if they prove themselves (Ansberry, 1993; Kilbom, 1995; Rose, 1995).
Employers hire contingents because they are often paid less than core workers and do not receive benefits.
In Washington, the Clinton Administration has given consideration to providing contingents the same legal protections and benefits enjoyed by permanent employees, such as health care and pensions.
We also were the first major broker in the industry to end the use of contingents, which we have abolished on a worldwide basis, and we believe that all insurance brokers and insurers should relinquish the use of contingent agreements.
NEW YORK -- Willis Group Holdings (NYSE: WSH) has reached a comprehensive agreement with the New York Attorney General and the Superintendent of Insurance for New York to resolve issues raised by the industry-wide investigation into contingent commissions.
clients who retained Willis to place insurance between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004, which resulted in contingent commissions.
These include the ban on contingent commissions, which Willis announced in October 2004, as well as the implementation of a number of practices reflected in the Willis Client Bill of Rights that Willis issued in July 2004, including:
The myth of a contingent work force masks a hidden agenda.
The piece claims that contingent workers account for a third of all workers, up from a quarter in 1988, and that "their ranks are growing so quickly they're expected to outnumber permanent full-time workers by the end of the decade.
Although wrenching change is transforming the American workplace and the human toll is enormous, the contingent work force is a myth.
IN HIS 1989 BOOK, THE CONTINGENT Economy, Richard Belous, chief economist at the union-backed National Planning Association, cobbles together four categories of workers that he labels "contingent": part-time, self-employed, business services, and temporary.
Since the workers in the four categories are normally excluded from collective bargaining, Belous sees "a more difficult environment for unions" as a major "cost" of contingent (read: flexible) work arrangements.