contemn


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Related to contemn: despised, disdains
  • verb

Synonyms for contemn

to regard with utter contempt and disdain

Synonyms for contemn

look down on with disdain

References in periodicals archive ?
The spectrum of difference exhibited at these shows suggests varying relationships with the West: some artists identify with or at least acknowledge the Western tradition, some contemn it.
Capriccio: These toys, sir, are the ensigns that discover my name and quality, my name being Capriccio; and I wear these bellows on my head to show I can puff up with glory all those that affect me, and, besides, bear this spur to show I can spur-gall even the best that contemn me.
At the novel's end, the Levovs' life is in tatters, and those who contemn Swede's family laugh and relish the fact.
In Henry Nevil Payne's, The Fatal Jealousy (1672), Jasper, played by Sandford, says "what a devil ayles my face, that she Contemns me thus?
Histamine constitutes little component, having molecule weight contemns that comprise of ring imidazol and etilamin's chain flank.
Socrates imagines the first incarnation of the state in perhaps "some lofty soul born in a mean city, the politics of which he contemns or neglects," or "peradventure," in someone whose "ill health kept him away from politics.
During the sixteenth century these players show up more and more often in the payment records of towns and great houses, and occasionally excite xenophobic outbursts, such as that of the Norwich citizen who contemns the "shameless and unnaturall tomblinges of the Italion Woemen" who performed there in 1574.
Thus Socrates would exile Homer not because he contemns poetry but to avoid the separation of language from doxology.
Law, for its part, contemns mere counsel and declares its utterly formal autonomy, as in Kant, for whom natural desires and tastes are "pathological.
Meanwhile the friend is on overfamiliar terms with a World tha contemns him--"The soil is this, that thou dost common grow"--and the poet, although he despises the World, repeats these rumors to the friend as if there might be some truth to them.
But Christ contemns the pompous food and rejects the temptation (Milton 1968, 2.