contain

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  • verb

Synonyms for contain

hold

Synonyms

Synonyms for contain

to be filled by

Synonyms

to have the room or capacity for

to bring one's emotions under control

Synonyms for contain

References in classic literature ?
Three of the pamphlets on that shelf contain quotations from 'The Patriot Martyrs.
It contains many curious things the chief being that when you cut off my head, if your majesty will turn to the sixth leaf, and read the third line of the left-hand page, my head will answer all the questions you like to ask it.
All these different products are afforded before the nut is formed, and while it is green it contains a delicious cooling water; with these nuts they store their gelves, and it is the only provision of water which is made in this country.
They have persistently grown more elaborate, until today a telephone set, as it stands on a desk, contains as many as one hundred and thirty separate pieces, as well as a saltspoonful of glistening granules of carbon.
The most considerable of the remaining objections is that the plan of the convention contains no bill of rights.
To the first I answer, that the Constitution proposed by the convention contains, as well as the constitution of this State, a number of such provisions.
The nut burns with a fitful bluish flame, and the oil that it contains is exhausted in about ten minutes.
It's not a wart," returned Master Robert Mistricolle, "it is an egg which contains another demon exactly similar, who bears another little egg which contains another devil, and so on.
I have a whole bag of tricks," he said, "which contains a hundred ways of escaping my enemies.
of the former and contains nearly an equal volume of carbonic acid, produced by the combustion of the elements of the blood.
This volume contains, in the form of a Journal, a history of our voyage, and a sketch of those observations in Natural History and Geology, which I think will possess some interest for the general reader.
The sixth volume of the 'Geological Transactions' contains two papers of mine on the Erratic Boulders and Volcanic Phenomena of South America.
It is clear that an emotion is essentially complex, and we have to inquire whether it ever contains any non-physiological material not reducible to sensations and images and their relations.
Clouds, rain, storms, and humors-- does the life of man contain aught but these?
The two or three lines which follow contain fragments of words only, mingled with blots and scratches of the pen.
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