Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to consul: consular, ETCD
  • noun

Words related to consul

a diplomat appointed by a government to protect its commercial interests and help its citizens in a foreign country

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
The immorality of his private life, his intimacy with Barras and Bernadotte, displeased the First Consul even more than his manoeuvres at the Bourse, and he struck du Bousquier's name from the list of the government contractors.
A man ruined by the First Consul interested the town of Alencon, to which he now returned, where royalism was secretly dominant.
Of course my statement must be taken cum grano, since I am writing from the dictation of a clerk of the Russian consul, who kindly translated for me, time being short.
So you say, consul," asked he for the twentieth time, "that this steamer is never behind time?
After exchanging a few words with his brother, the First Consul made a sign with his hand, which Murat and Lannes obeyed by retiring.
No going into company--no company at home--not a creature sees my lord-- not even the consul, or the banker.
The bag contained my checkbook, and certain letters which assisted me in proving my identity to the consul.
When I returned from the country I found among my other letters a long letter from the consul.
United States Consul Lingford was a fussy, elderly gentleman, and in the two years of his service at Attu-Attu had never encountered so unprecedented a case as that laid before him by Boyd Duncan.
This change made it necessary for me to send one of my servants to obtain my letters and remittances from the English consul in a certain city, which was no longer included as one of my resting-places in my new travelling scheme.
One of our consuls told me that a portier of a great Berlin hotel paid five thousand dollars a year for his position, and yet cleared six thousand dollars for himself.
The second clause of the second section of the second article empowers the President of the United States "to nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all other OFFICERS of United States whose appointments are NOT in the Constitution OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, and WHICH SHALL BE ESTABLISHED BY LAW.
And under no latitude of construction will the term comprehend consuls.
He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
Moors and Jews sometimes place themselves under the protection of the foreign consuls, and then they can flout their riches in the Emperor's face with impunity.