construe

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Synonyms for construe

interpret

Synonyms for construe

to understand in a particular way

to express in another language, while systematically retaining the original sense

Synonyms for construe

References in classic literature ?
The chapel-bell began to ring at a quarter to eleven, and Tom got in early and took his place in the lowest row, and watched all the other boys come in and take their places, filling row after row; and tried to construe the Greek text which was inscribed over the door with the slightest possible success, and wondered which of the masters, who walked down the chapel and took their seats in the exalted boxes at the end, would be his lord.
She used to consult him on passages of French which she could not understand, though her mother was a Frenchwoman, and which he would construe to her satisfaction: and, besides giving her his aid in profane literature, he was kind enough to select for her books of a more serious tendency, and address to her much of his conversation.
If you wish to engage in the academic investigation of Islamic intellectual history, you will have to accept that "revelation" or divinely inspired "canon" of whatever form, as a believer construes it, does not constitute historical evidence, as academic historians construe it.
This is illustrated most disturbingly in the way he apologizes for his conduct, cunningly failing to address the charge of cruelty levied against him: with a kind of sick humor, Gilbert construes the charge to refer to his physical treatment of the corpses of the dead rebels, firmly ignoring--and thus silencing--the real charge of psychological cruelty (ad terrorem) inflicted on the captives approaching to "parley.
It is not clear that DeLeon regretted his departure, yet Bender construes it as evidence that professionalization brought about "a narrowing in the spectrum of legitimate social analysis," even as he also acknowledges that professionalization on Seligman's terms "moved the general discussion of economics to the left.