conjure man


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  • noun

Synonyms for conjure man

a witch doctor who practices conjury

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References in periodicals archive ?
When Jose insinuates sarcastically that Aurisio has come from an appointment with a conjure man, Aurisio denies it vehemently and states that he is coming from Sunday Mass instead.
Despite of all these warnings, Jose insults gravely the black conjure man with racist epithets as he passes by the old man's house on his Sunday walk, doing so significantly at the exact time of the Holy Mass in town: "'Hey, there, Mangolo
The conjure man in Battle of Angels is an "ancient Negro" with "awesome dignity"; he is "small and cadaverous, a wizard-like figure" with a fistful of eternal charms.
9) But ultimately, Fly, like the conjure man and Eunice Hubbell's black neighbor, reminds us of the kairos, the timeless world that Williams associates with many of his black characters.
This theme is quite suggestive, especially for novels of the Harlem Renaissance like Claude McKay's Home to Harlem, Rudolph Fisher's The Conjure Man Dies, Wallace Thurman's The Blacker the Berry, Walter White's Fright, and Jessie Fauset's Plum Bun.
Inasmuch as this scene recalls similar bloodletting rituals performed by the resident conjure man in Joe Turner's Come And Gone, it also warrants being viewed in terms of Wilson's efforts to infuse his plays with recognizable images of Africa.
Hopkins is a welcome surprise, and the brief excerpt of Rudolph Fisher's The Conjure Man Dies leaves us not only thirsting for more, but a bit disappointed to realize that Fisher did not live long enough to write more adventures about detective duo Archer and Dart.
Commencing in the middle of the Voodoo story, Rhodes captures readers with the novel's first scene, in which Marie Laveau exacts a frightening and "possessed" vengeance on Papa John, the New Orleans conjure man who has poisonously exploited and scandalously manipulated a Laveau genealogy that begins with the spirit worker Membe:
Also, conjure abilities are found to run in families; the conjure man or woman inherits his/her aptitude and the mantle of power, along with an expertise in herbal medicines.
Vesey, a free and literate black, was influenced, like other leaders of revolts (Turner and Gabriel, for example), by the telling analogues of the Bible, but unlike other leaders, Vesey did not disparage the usefulness of black folk beliefs and had, as his second-in-command, a man named Gullah Jack, an Angola-born Sea Islander and conjure man (Levine 75-77).
As he nears death, the status-conscious Joe engages the assistance of a conjure man to ward off the spell he believes Janie, his wife of twenty years, has had put on him.
Such parallels support the view that Corrothers's use of the name Sandy Jenkins is more than coincidental, and, taken with his more general ambivalence toward dialect and his concerns about stereotypes, suggest that the poet Sandy stands in relation to Corrothers, as, years before, the conjure man Sandy had stood to Frederick Douglass, as an essentially negative or, at best, ambiguous figure.
Like Douglass, before he finally recognized the foolishness of placing himself in the hands of conjure man Sandy Jenkins, those who follow the poet-ideologist Jenkins are squarely on the wrong path, too.