conjuncture

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Related to conjunctures: conjectures
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Words related to conjuncture

a critical combination of events or circumstances

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Under pressure of the economic conjuncture and reduction of price for aluminum, the income of the company reduced significantly.
In Modern Buddhist Conjunctures in Myanmar: Cultural Narratives, Colonial Legacies, and Civil Society, Juliane Schober examines several "conjunctures" or "pivotal moments" between the 17th century and the present that acutely demonstrate the complex dynamics between Theravada Buddhism and the country's political centers, offering a glimpse into how Buddhists have entered the public sphere.
The primary thesis of Conjunctures seeks to dispel the myth set forth by Max Weber; i.
Perhaps this is the point at which to say more about hegemony, a concept that is associated with thinking about conjunctures, and those periods where there's a particular political settlement.
Capitalism may, at the simplest level, be one thing, but it has its conjunctures too, and the analysis requires this kind of historical specificity.
Modern Buddhist conjunctures in Myanmar; cultural narratives, colonial legacies, and civil society.
In the past, conjunctures have tended to be discussed in national terms - dealing with the coming together in a given space of different tendencies and sets of political forces and possibilities.
While he moves more rapidly in contrasting 1790 and 1823 as industrial conjunctures, he nonetheless teases out local, national and international forces that led to dramatic changes in the nature and future of Catalan growth.
This is an interdisciplinary exploration of conjunctures between postcolonialism and tourism theory as seen primarily through an aesthetic, literary lens.
Or, more exactly, it would be helpful to distinguish between a semi-permanent frame around economic activity and the more transitory conjunctural ordering of the economy in specific configurations for periods of four to seven years; and to recognise that such conjunctures combine asset values and flows of funds with justifying narratives - which social scientists have often bought into or actively propagated, without properly distinguishing between discourse and practice.
His narrative, which begins in 1400, emphasizes these historical contingencies and conjunctures, along with "silver, sugar, slaves, and cotton.