confound

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Synonyms for confound

Synonyms for confound

to cause (a person) to be self-consciously distressed

to make incapable of finding something to think, do, or say

to take (one thing) mistakenly for another

Synonyms for confound

References in periodicals archive ?
The choice of the empirical confounders in HDPS analyses is generally based on bivariate associations of the confounder and the exposure and the bivariate association of the confounder and the outcome.
We need to consider substantive knowledge in decisions on adjustment for confounders.
Using expert opinion, this study aims to derive the prior distributions of bias parameters to adjust an unmeasured confounder when internal data sources are not available.
Imai, Keele and Yamamoto (2010) proposed to assess the presence of confounders through an analysis of sensitivity where the causal effects are calculated presetting values for the correlation between the residuals of equations (4) and (5).
A sensitivity analysis determine the magnitude of a potential unmeasured confounder that would need to be present to materially alter the conclusions of a study
An intermediate variable is included in a causal chain leading to drinking and driving and is different from a confounder in that it plays a causal role.
This was a complex protocol with multiple treatment confounders.
Inclusion criteria were that each study had to be an analytical study reporting the effect of acid suppression on CDI incidence, and had to be adjusted for confounders such as antibiotic use.
Canadian human rights activist Nazanin Afshin-Jam, president and confounder of the Stop Child Executions organization, moderated the award ceremony.
Accordingly, in this study they examined the extent to which confounder induced bias exceeds collider induced bias.
Maternal intelligence, however, has largely been overlooked as a potential confounder in studies investigating the effects of breast-feeding, according to Geoff Der, a statistician at the Medical Research Council's Social and Public Health Sciences Unit in Glasgow, Scotland.
To illustrate assumptions underlying these approaches, we consider a scenario in which we are interested in assessing relationships between a continuously measured exposure (X), a binary confounder (Z), a binary indicator of sex (S), and a continuous outcome of interest (Y).
Table 3: Standardized Differences among Confounders by Propensity Score Method Unweighted No Early Early Childhood Childhood Therapy Therapy Standardized Confounder Mean (SE) Mean (SE) Differences * Birth weight (g) 1,030.
Also, "although we adjusted for [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], smoking is an unmeasured confounder.