confidence

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Synonyms for confidence

secret

Synonyms

in confidence

Synonyms

Synonyms for confidence

absolute certainty in the trustworthiness of another

a firm belief in one's own powers

the fact or condition of being without doubt

Synonyms for confidence

a feeling of trust (in someone or something)

a state of confident hopefulness that events will be favorable

Related Words

a trustful relationship

a secret that is confided or entrusted to another

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
By inviting his confidence, she would doubtless draw something from him that would deny or corroborate her father's opinion of his sentiments.
Macfarlane had talked himself into some measure of superiority and confidence, but the uncommon energy of this refusal cast him back into his first confusion.
I had seen enough of the contrary nature of the old sinner to understand that any strong sign of interest would be the surest way to stop his confidences.
A rector lives in a web of petty secrets, and confidences and warnings, and the wiser he is the less he will regard them.
There was that about the mop-headed young man which invited confidences.
He could not picture May Welland, in whatever conceivable emergency, hawking about her private difficulties and lavishing her confidences on strange men; and she had never seemed to him finer or fairer than in the week that followed.
But between Evelina and other girls there was this difference, that where another would have poured out her feelings quite naturally, Evelina regarded these innocent confidences as a concession made to the stormy emotions which had invaded the quiet sanctuary of her girlish soul.
But there are unexpressed confidences, Mr Clennam; and as you have been together intimately among these people, I cannot doubt that a confidence of that sort exists in the present case.
The follies and disloyalty committed in his youth were to be expiated by a long and painful penance, ere he could be restored to the full enjoyment of the confidence of his ancient people; and without confidence there could be no authority in an Indian tribe.
I should never deserve her confidence again, after forcing from her a confession of what is meant at present to be unacknowledged to any one.
Your excuses have gone straight to my heart; and your confidence in my humble abilities has followed in the sa me direction.
Is it the immediate object of this confidence, that you may at once ascertain that, with my knowledge?
The general presented the ambassador with a rich robe, and returned this gallant answer: "That he and his fellow-soldiers were come with an intention to drive Mahomet out of these countries, which he had wrongfully usurped; that his present design was, instead of returning back the way he came, as Mahomet advised, to open himself a passage through the country of his enemies; that Mahomet should rather think of determining whether he would fight or yield up his ill-gotten territories, than of prescribing measures to him; that he put his whole confidence in the omnipotence of God and the justice of his cause, and that to show how just a sense he had of Mahomet's kindness, he took the liberty of presenting him with a looking-glass and a pair of pincers.
We have seen, however, that it has not had thus far an extensive prevalency; that even in this country, where it made its first appearance, Pennsylvania and North Carolina are the only two States by which it has been in any degree patronized; and that all the others have refused to give it the least countenance; wisely judging that confidence must be placed somewhere; that the necessity of doing it, is implied in the very act of delegating power; and that it is better to hazard the abuse of that confidence than to embarrass the government and endanger the public safety by impolitic restrictions on the legislative authority.
Instead of their being "joined in affection" and free from all apprehension of different "interests," envy and jealousy would soon extinguish confidence and affection, and the partial interests of each confederacy, instead of the general interests of all America, would be the only objects of their policy and pursuits.