confidence


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Related to confidence: confidence interval
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  • noun
  • phrase

Synonyms for confidence

secret

Synonyms

in confidence

Synonyms

Synonyms for confidence

absolute certainty in the trustworthiness of another

a firm belief in one's own powers

the fact or condition of being without doubt

Synonyms for confidence

a feeling of trust (in someone or something)

a state of confident hopefulness that events will be favorable

Related Words

a trustful relationship

a secret that is confided or entrusted to another

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
Am I, or am I not, worthy of your confidence in me?
Your confidence in me ought to be returned with full confidence on my part.
On the other supposition, it will not possess the confidence of the people, and its schemes of usurpation will be easily defeated by the State governments, who will be supported by the people.
Well, Monsieur Laporte placed her near her Majesty in order that our poor queen might at least have someone in whom she could place confidence, abandoned as she is by the king, watched as she is by the cardinal, betrayed as she is by everybody.
He feared that the confidence of his associate would be abated by such an avowal.
Astor until some time afterwards, or it might have modified the trust and confidence reposed in them.
Such confidence, powerful in its own warmth, and bewitching in the wit which often expressed it, must have been enough for Anne; but Lady Russell saw it very differently.
She is decorated all over with beads and bracelets and embroidered dandelions; but her principal decoration consists of the softest little gray eyes in the world, which rest upon you with a profundity of confidence--a confidence that I really feel some compunction in betraying.
It destroys likewise magnanimity, and the raising of human nature; for take an example of a dog, and mark what a generosity and courage he will put on, when he finds himself maintained by a man; who to him is instead of a God, or melior natura; which courage is manifestly such, as that creature, without that confidence of a better nature than his own, could never attain.
I may now state to your ladyship, in confidence, that the name of that firm is Kenge and Carboy, of Lincoln's Inn, which may not be altogether unknown to your ladyship in connexion with the case in Chancery of Jarndyce and Jarndyce.
Formerly, too, tyrannies were more common than now, on account of the very extensive powers with which some magistrates were entrusted: as the prytanes at Miletus; for they were supreme in many things of the last consequence; and also because at that time the cities were not of that very great extent, the people in general living in the country, and being employed in husbandry, which gave them, who took the lead in public affairs, an opportunity, if they had a turn for war, to make themselves tyrants; which they all did when they had gained the confidence of the people; and this confidence was their hatred to the rich.
It reminds me of the journal I opened with the New Year, once, when I was a boy and a confiding and a willing prey to those impossible schemes of reform which well-meaning old maids and grandmothers set for the feet of unwary youths at that season of the year--setting oversized tasks for them, which, necessarily failing, as infallibly weaken the boy's strength of will, diminish his confidence in himself and injure his chances of success in life.
He was an excellent fellow, who testified the most absolute confidence in his master, and the most unlimited devotion to his interests, even anticipating his wishes and orders, which were always intelligently executed.
I soon discovered that Old File and Young File were much further advanced in the doctor's confidence than Mill, Screw, or myself.
I wonder if I should shake your sublime confidence in yourself, if I suggested the most ticklish subject to handle which is known to the stage?