condescendence


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Related to condescendence: sporadic, felicitation, capricious, altercation
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Synonyms for condescendence

superciliously indulgent treatment, especially of those considered inferior

References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, it is important to note, that although he was quite liberal-minded himself he did not adopt an attitude of condescendence towards religion.
Accounts of asylum law in practice, of the ways family reunification is dealt with by official authorities and/or by the legislator, accounts of the way state officials react to examples of the local indigenous administration of justice are littered with sometimes very manifest condescendence and also occasionally brutish exercises of power, in the name of the law, in the name of the fundamental values supposedly undergirding that law, in the name of equality for all the citizens, and in the name of many other lofty legal principles.
Only in recent years, awareness has grown that even texts with overtly profiled narratorship such as Heine's Ideen can communicate through "indirection, iconic suggestion and association," through "insistence on unspoken implications" (Phelan 99), whereas narratorial overtness and explicitness used to be linked with patronizing and overbearing condescendence.
The concept of condescendence as theorized and practiced by Erasmus attempts to make possible a dialogue with heretics.
more and more people 'are sick and tired of Romania', this detail and the feelings behind it are likely to be regarded with condescendence or maybe with surprise.
But ignoring it or treating it with condescendence, motivated by the achievements in Libya, would cost Obama dearly, especially if he fails to take decisive action in Syria or provides Iran and Hezbollah in Lebanon with a way out, and for the regime in Damascus.
The proposal by Russian President Dmitry Medvedev for a new security pact - greeted with condescendence across the Atlantic - was nevertheless welcomed by several European partners (France, Germany or Spain) as an advance worth considering, even though its content is still very vague for the moment, if only to help restore relations of confidence with Russia.
Mihaela Frunza's work demonstrates clearly that, paradoxically, in certain countries from Eastern Europe feminism has stored a negative connotation that ranges from "ignorance to condescendence, stereotypical rejection, rejection on a nationalist basis or traditionalism".