compression

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Related to compression of morbidity: expansion of morbidity
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Synonyms for compression

Synonyms for compression

a compressing of something

Synonyms for compression

an increase in the density of something

the process or result of becoming smaller or pressed together

encoding information while reducing the bandwidth or bits required

References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, as the elimination of chronic diseases would lead to an increase in the percentage of DFLE in LE, a relative compression of morbidity would be expected (also at percentages far below those found among women).
Analyzing studies carried out in other countries, the elimination of chronic diseases would lead to the compression of morbidity in some situations (24).
The results in Tables 5 and 6 indicate that the long-term trends in the compression of morbidity applied to females as well as males, consistent with the short-term trends in Table 7 and in Hubert et al.
E, 1980, Aging, Natural Death, and the Compression of Morbidity, New England Journal of Medicine, 303(3): 130-135.
If, as the evidence seems to show, aging is a cumulative process of "wear and tear" in response to environmental demands, this era of stagnant, and perhaps downward, mobility could reverse the compression of morbidity (Seeman et al.
The health status of younger people also suggests that the compression of morbidity could be reversed.
Given no prior ADL limitation one would expect to see a compression of morbidity but not with an associated expansion in mortality (Table IVA).
The second scenario, the compression of morbidity, only achieves its goal if it is possible to postpone every disease or chronic condition until just before death.
And if a full compression of morbidity is not yet on the horizon, there is no reason we can't do something about osteoporosis, Alzheimer disease, and arthritis in the reasonably near future.