complacence


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  • noun

Synonyms for complacence

the feeling you have when you are satisfied with yourself

References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time he warned against complacence of banks and drew attention to the fact that banks in the country had the heaviest weighting to the local property market via home loans than any other banking sector in the world.
But the moment I stepped into Ushna in Abu Dhabi, my "been there, done that" culinary complacence swiftly turned into a rousing anticipation.
Although we remain patient while the economic improvements widely anticipated in 2013 take hold, patience should not be confused with complacence.
He stressed that the leak poses no immediate public heath risk but said that fact should not be an excuse for complacence.
Professional Development in Corrections: Commitment or Complacence, Robert J.
None of the authors recall that experience with happy complacence.
This error was exacerbated by Cameron's persistent complacence over government and police officials conniving to stop any investigation into News International.
Of recent, such already strained relationship is further troubled, when South Sudan accused Chinese oil companies for being in cohort or at least complacence with Khartoum stealing the oil of South Sudan.
When the score echoes through the opening montage of Manhattan's disfigured skyline, it both elegizes all that is absent in the post-9/11 moment--comfort, complacence, symbolic edifice, and several thousand lives--and calls forth a new, abiding and spectral American fear.
While seeking to produce informed, faith-filled graduates, Catholic educators also want them to be critical thinkers looking at the world with an eye for change, not complacence.
It is a good thing, but it also sometimes could be not a good thing because maybe people are a little complacence or they get a little bit lazy because they know someone was going to take care of them, so instead of starting a new business or working really hard, they know that there is a safety net there.
And for their openness that shows no complacence and steadfastness that shuts no doors.
Over the last decade, a "perfect storm" has developed: lucrative contract-labor fees (often triple what laws allow); growing demand for workers, coupled with relative impunity for brokers; bigger profits; malleable "host" governments for contract-factories; and finally, complacence on the part of buyers.
We can't afford complacence - not when 80 percent to 90 percent of sharps injuries are preventable, according to the CDC.
All of the above statements are only partially correct; importantly, they may lull the practitioner into complacence and place him or her in peril for a malpractice claim.