commandment


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Related to commandment: First Commandment
  • noun

Synonyms for commandment

Synonyms for commandment

something that is commanded

References in classic literature ?
the old gentlemen, not in the least knowing what point of the ceremony we had arrived at, stood most amiably beaming at the ten commandments.
In the commandments of God, or of the church, I don't know which.
He took this Indian into his family, and by constant intercourse with him soon become sufficiently conversant with the vocabulary and construction of the language to translate the ten commandments, the Lord's prayer, and several passages of Scripture, besides composing exhortations and prayers.
Greek, Turkish and Armenian morals consist only in attending church regularly on the appointed Sabbaths, and in breaking the ten commandments all the balance of the week.
Hatfield was one of those who 'bind heavy burdens, and grievous to be borne, and lay them upon men's shoulders, while they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers'; and who 'make the word of God of none effect by their traditions, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.
Borckman was on his way for another nip, after having thickly threatened to knock seven bells and the ten commandments out of the black at the wheel for faulty steering, when Jerry appeared before him and blocked the way to his desire.
It is written, The first of all commandments, 'Thou shalt worship The Lord thy God, and only Him shalt serve.
It was as if God's World had fallen into the muck mire of the abyss underlying the bottom of hell; as if Jehovah's Commandments had been presented on carved stone to the monkeys of the monkey cage at the Zoo; as if the Sermon on the Mount had been preached in a roaring bedlam of lunatics.
He was a good German(and when Germans are good they are very good) who kept the commandments, voted for the Government, grew prize potatoes and bred innumerable sheep, drove to Berlin once a year with the wool in a procession of waggons behind him and sold it at the annual Wollmarkt, rioted soberly for a few days there, and then carried most of the proceeds home, hunted as often as possible, helped his friends, punished his children, read his Bible, said his prayers, and was genuinely astonished when his wife had the affectation to die of a broken heart.
I could have put up with his drunkenness and neglect of his business, if he had not broke one of the sacred commandments.
It broke from one line in the table of commandments at the altar, and illuminated the building with the words.
The place seemed smaller than it used to be; but there were the old monuments on which he had gazed with childish awe a thousand times; the little pulpit with its faded cushion; the Communion table before which he had so often repeated the Commandments he had reverenced as a child, and forgotten as a man.
Nevertheless, one of the reasons Luther did not renumber the Ten Commandments (as did Ulrich Zwingli and other Reformed theologians) is that he understood the prohibition of graven images as simply one way Moses applied the First Commandment to his own people.
For example, tzedakah, a prominent commandment to give to the poor or to do righteous deeds to those in need, is not in the Ten Commandments.
This commandment is impossible for women to follow.