term

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Synonyms for term

come to terms

Synonyms

  • come to an agreement
  • reach agreement
  • come to an understanding
  • conclude agreement

come to terms with something

Synonyms

  • learn to live with
  • come to accept
  • be reconciled to
  • reach acceptance of

in terms of

Synonyms

Synonyms for term

a limited or specific period of time during which something happens, lasts, or extends

the period during which someone or something exists

a specific length of time characterized by the occurrence of certain conditions or events

a sound or combination of sounds that symbolizes and communicates a meaning

an established position from which to operate or deal with others

to describe with a word or term

Synonyms for term

a word or expression used for some particular thing

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(usually plural) a statement of what is required as part of an agreement

any distinct quantity contained in a polynomial

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the end of gestation or point at which birth is imminent

(architecture) a statue or a human bust or an animal carved out of the top of a square pillar

name formally or designate with a term

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References in periodicals archive ?
A few writers explore the insanity of Van Helsing's wife--some in a most poetic way, others taking unexpected avenues, such as the story in which Van Helsing loses his wife because she comes to terms with her lesbianism.
Home and Away (Ch5): Fisher comes to terms with his past and Will delays his return to Summer Bay.
How October eventually comes to terms with her history and reclaims the son she has given away, is at the heart of this sensitive and authentically rendered tale.
ROBeRT IS NO BaBY IN THIS SPIN-OFF, PLaYING THe TOUGH COP WITH a HeaRT OF GOLD WHO COMeS TO TeRMS WITH BeING GaY.
The novel, translated from the Dutch, portrays a coming-of-age story of sorts that spans four decades as Ellen comes to terms with human failings, misconceptions, guilt, blame and forgiveness.
The film gets interesting as her son Tommy (Stanislas Crevillen) quickly susses out what his mom is up to, then almost as rapidly comes to terms with his naturally conflicted filial loyalties.