colonize

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settle

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settle as a colony

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settle as colonists or establish a colony (in)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Coloniser mode' exchange involved a pulse of exotic imports during a sustained colonisation event.
Again, a similar argument for direct procurement of obsidians over long distances during colonisation phases has been made for Lapita and south coast Papua.
distinction between sites with large or small pieces of obsidian might then allow recognition of some sites as part of a colonisation front' (Specht 2002: 39).
There is still debate about when the ancestral canoes arrived in New Zealand from tropical east Polynesia, but the general consensus is that colonisation commenced no earlier than the last half of the thirteenth century AD (Walter & Jacomb 2007).
In particular, we argue that the importance of early long-distance interaction is not necessarily about maintaining links between colonies and homeland, but about securing social and biological reproduction for isolated communities on an expanding colonisation front.
To the final shore: prehistoric colonisation of the sub-antarctic islands in south Polynesia, in A.
Colonisation, trade and exchange: from Papua to Lapita, in J.
In this paper we compared early exchange in New Zealand to the Melanesian record, pointing out that the short, early pulse in the long-distance movement of MIO is analogous to pulses that occur during colonisation phases in Lapita and other early Austronesian communities.
In New Zealand, coloniser mode exchange is evidenced by a pulse in long-distance obsidian movement which declined sharply within a few generations of colonisation.
Kirch (1988) suggests that long-distance exchange during a formative period may have provided a 'lifeline' to the securely established communities of the homelands which could provide critical resources at times of environmental crisis, or suitable marriage partners to supplement demographically small and unstable groups on the frontiers of an expanding colonisation front.