collared peccary


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Related to collared peccary: javelina
  • noun

Synonyms for collared peccary

dark grey peccary with an indistinct white collar

References in periodicals archive ?
elk, bighorn, pronghorn, mule deer, collared peccary, and white-tailed deer) within each study area.
Despite reports that suggest the collared peccary could act as a reservoir for Leptospira spp.
These items comprised approximately 15% of the volume; the remaining volume was composed of collared peccary hair.
Collared peccary and mule deer were regularly photographed at the feeding station, although we attribute all instances of removal of fruit to the former.
In addition to feeding trials, opportunistic monitoring of patches of gourd at the Sul Ross State University Ranch provided further evidence of consumption of fruit by collared peccary.
collared peccary, is native to North America and an automatic in our egalitarian program.
In addition to the Chacoan peccary, there is the white-lipped peccary, which lives mostly in dense rain forests from southern Mexico to northern Argentina, and the collared peccary, or javelina, which ranges from northern Argentina and Uruguay to the U.
Hall (1981) mapped northern Texas as within the range of the javelina or collared peccary, Tayassu tajacu, on the basis of a supposed record from Montague County, which we have been unable to verify and that was not recognized by Sowls (1984).
The extant collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) has no Pleistocene record in the United States, where it is known only from archaeological sites of late Holocene age.
Common medium and large mammals in the area include the collared peccary (Pecan tajacu), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), white-nosed coati (Nasua narica), nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), cougar (Puma concolor), ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), margay (Leopardus wiedii), coyote (Canis latrans), and gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus; Dalquest, 1953; Hall, 1981).
Recent fieldwork in Bastrop County, Texas, resulted in visual and photographic documentation of the collared peccary east of its known range.
Many refer to the javelina, or collared peccary, as a pig when actually they are not pigs at all but more closely related to bears and badgers.
The collared peccary is a nonruminating-foregut fermenter, with a large, complex stomach (Langer, 1978).
The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), raccoon (Procyon lotor), and southern plains woodrat (Neotoma micropus) form a guild of mast-consuming species native to southern Texas.