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Related to cobalamin: folic acid, vitamin B12, cobalamin deficiency, Methylcobalamin
  • noun

Synonyms for cobalamin

References in periodicals archive ?
The intraindividual variation of total HC (6%) and holoHC (6%) in our study was low compared with previously reported results for cobalamin (9%) and hoIoTC (16%) (12), which most likely reflects that holoHC is a more stable marker over time than is holoTC, as judged from its half-life of more than a week compared with the half-life of TC, which is in the magnitude of hours (2).
In the case of cobalamin specifically, the situation is more complex.
In contrast with previously published data (23), both the variance and the geometric mean of cobalamin were observed to decrease with age until 14 years, after which mean concentrations remained constant (Table 1).
Interactions between hydroxocobalamin and nitric oxide (NO)--evidence for a redox reaction between NO and reduced cobalamin and reversible NO binding to oxidized cobalamin.
Alterations in the binding site of cobalamin to trans-cobalamin II
Serum cobalamin levels were significantly higher in the oral group than in the parenteral group at 2 months (643 [+ or -] 328 vs.
Pregnant and lactating women should eat foods rich in cobalamin are take a daily supplement containing cobalamin.
Cobalamin transport can be amplified by the use of proprietary nanoparticles or polymers that can greatly amplify uptake.
Methylmalonic acid serves as an indicator of cobalamin status because its conversion to succinate requires adenosylcobalamin.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of oral cyanocobalamin therapy in the treatment of cobalamin (vitamin B(12))-deficient anemia.
This process is dependent on one-carbon metabolism, a pathway in which folate and cobalamin have essential roles in the recruitment and transfer of methyl groups.
For example, in a randomized trial, 6 months of homocysteine-lowering treatment with folic acid 2 mg daily, cobalamin (vitamin B12) 0.
Also known as cobalamin, vitamin B12 is necessary for the synthesis of red blood cells and maintenance of a healthy nervous system.
Research: Investigators set out to determine whether high doses of folic acid, pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and cobalamin (vitamin B12) could reduce the risk of recurrent stroke over a two year period compared with low doses of these vitamins.