coalitionist


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Related to coalitionist: Coalitions
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Synonyms for coalitionist

one nation associated with another in a common cause

References in periodicals archive ?
Anger, especially coalitionist anger on the streets, is a crucial element of the GTSG's politics which has been more often than not bleached out of government-funded material for GLBTIQ youth.
When there is unity in the Afrikan American community; when the next generation of Black youth have been taught and have internalized the necessity of loving and respecting themselves, their heritage, and their community, only then will we be positioned to think about and create coalitionist activities and Black-White unity.
Discussion of this harassment and violence suggests a likely point of coalitionist activity among gay men, lesbians and other non-heterosexual groups and appears to offer the possibility of alliances with groups who are disenfranchised on such grounds as race, ethnicity or disability (Cunneen et al.
If McAuliffe was a coalitionist by upbringing, he remained one out of necessity: Despite being near the center of Democratic presidential politics in the 1980s, McAuliffe managed to steer clear of the fractious intramural quarrels that split the party during that decade.
winning coalitions are the only coalitions that have value), that individual members of winning coalitions receive positive payoffs and that coalitional adherence is non-binding, either to the coalitionist or to the coalition.
This was a thing to wonder at, for all at once the government party had become popular again after years of being scornfully labelled as 'the lackeys of Turkey' or 'foreign slaves' or 'Vienna's hired gaolers' which for years had been the epithets lavished on them by the Coalitionist press.
The Lloyd George he admired as a radical Chancellor, he distrusted as coalitionist and crony of so many Tories, and came slowly to hate.
This political strategy and the ideas associated with it have diverse and nationally specific roots in movements and institutions such as the Demos Foundation, the emergence of the Democratic Leadership Council in the Reagan era, and the social democratisation of Euro-communism in the 1970s and 1980s (exemplified perhaps by the coalitionist political strategy of the Italian Communist Party).
There being no takers for the LPP leadership's wilder coalitionist schemes, the party would make its debut in the national elections of 1945.
The coalitionist feels little sympathy for the necessary pragmatism of the social democrat.