clubby

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  • adj

Synonyms for clubby

effusively sociable

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befitting or characteristic of those who incline to social exclusiveness and who rebuff the advances of people considered inferior

References in periodicals archive ?
We are currently witnessing the unraveling of the Roman Catholic church as we know it, particularly as regards its secrecy and male-dominated clubbiness.
With the growing clubbiness of the Permanent Five, the value of a nonpermanent seat can perhaps be measured in terms of a single, symbolic payoff for the state: international recognition.
With his keen eye for affect, Brown pounces on all the Etonians' plummy little mannerisms: their clubbiness, mutual flattery, pedantic allusions, gratuitous Gallicisms, and Latin tags flaunted like designer labels.
as Many of the leading postwar economists have combined a criticism of technical clubbiness with a deep appreciation of the basics and a will to illuminate for the Everyman the comparative virtue of the free enterprise system--an appreciation and a will that make the great tradition of economics.
Perhaps it is the awful, cosy clubbiness of the BBC's Paris studio that has mellowed him.
What set me on edge was the clubbiness of the scene, the bitchiness, particularly in the position I was in, because I was a newcomer.
This clubbiness protected Ames who, as the son of a C.
They exude a clubbiness, an "inthe-knowness," that I abhor in everyday life.
Plus a certain clubbiness with other believers, a rather smug "We're in on the truth" attitude.
Few doubt that the male clubbiness of the House of Commons will change.
No, they don't get to experience the horrid status-conscious clubbiness of private education but they do get a rounded education in real-life, which is far more valuable.
If the Washington anti-nuclear groups seem to all know each other, and appear a little clubby, the clubbiness goes two ways.
Given the inherent clubbiness of the Senate, members' zeal to jump on scraps of evidence leads one to conclude that Tower was a supremely unpopular fellow.