circumscription


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  • noun

Synonyms for circumscription

the act of limiting or condition of being limited

Words related to circumscription

the act of circumscribing

References in periodicals archive ?
Depicted as boundless, then, Milton's God creates through circumscription, setting the foot of the golden compass down in chaos "to circumscribe / This universe and all created things.
However, career construction--life design theory; the life-span, life-space theory; and the theory of circumscription and compromise, which were featured prominently in vocational behavior research, were not evident in establishing evidence-based practice.
For the election of the local councils and mayors, each commune, town, city and administrative-territorial sub-division of it, constitutes an electoral circumscription.
Circumscription is the process by which people eliminate from the range of career possibilities occupations that conflict with the way in which each individual has come to view him- or herself, thereby creating a zone of acceptable alternatives (Gottfredson, 1981, 1996).
Artfully historical, fictionally sociological, mysteriously haunting, Lyonel Trouillot's poet(h)ical circumscription of a realistic utopia leaves open the window to la belle amour humaine.
The theory supporting our analysis, Gottfredson's (2005) theory of compromise and circumscription, shares many of these same assumptions.
Some of this circumscription or enlargement and enrichment of career possibilities results from interactions with socialization agents.
The Constitution itself (Article IV, Section 2, Clause 3) enshrined this circumscription of travel by requiring that escaped slaves be returned to their "owners": "No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.
Furthermore, as the author rightly suggests, the relative geographic circumscription of southern England presents an ideal analytic environment for evaluating such technological developments or processes.
With respect to the former, the Institute describes areas where FIN 48 has led to better information but concludes that, on balance, FIN 48 can be misleading, especially in its circumscription of management judgment about the likely settlement of tax contingencies.
In short, art reveals the complexity of sense--in the sense of the sensible and the intelligible--which in each case resists the circumscription of "sense" within an as such.
However, there has been little consensus concerning the circumscription or phylogenetic position of this subfamily.
This role will become increasingly acute in the face of Malthusian realities as the global human population swells to carrying capacity, as energy demand outstrips energy supply, as food prices rise around the world and attendant environmental degradation and circumscription continues inexorably and unabated to make food less and less available to more and more people.
No express constitutional provision, undoubtedly, delineates the above indicated parameters but this is a necessarily implied circumscription inbuilt in the very purpose for which constitution come into existence: to facilitate a people to live their dreams to graduate to realising their cherished worldview.