churchwoman


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  • noun

Synonyms for churchwoman

References in periodicals archive ?
From the famous painting of Salem - showing a traditionally garbed churchwoman concealing the devil in her shawl - to today's school eisteddfodau every March 1, the dress has long acted as an iconic element of our nationhood.
Illustrating what this dialectic might look like to those not yet a part of it, a black churchwoman named Martha Gaines reports her surprise at a magazine article on Harlan's travels.
For Austen's own part, Oliver MacDonagh has said that "there can be at least no reasonable doubt that Jane Austen was a conscientious and believing churchwoman.
Major white activists included churchwoman Sarah Patton Boyle and editors Hodding Carter II and Ralph McGill.
Moody attributes scholars' neglect of the spirituality embodied in these texts by black holy women partly to the perpetuation of the stereotype of the black churchwoman, a rendition of the slave plantation mammy: obese, long-suffering, selfless, and sexless (167).
Rev Susan Brown, the first churchwoman in charge of any British cathedral, said: "This is a wonderful thing for Dornoch because it is going to bring a lot of people here.
Churchwoman of the Year by the Religious Heritage of America--1969
What is more, the present Queen is a convinced and sincere Churchwoman, who knows a good deal more about the personnel of the Church, after fifty years on the throne, than the Prim e Minister; but he will give her the Government's formal advice, which she will have to take.
The same excellent scholar turned down at our seminary as a Catholic is also under suspicion at her university because she is a committed churchwoman dedicated to retrieval of the Catholic tradition of moral theology.
He accused the churchwoman of urging forgiveness, "as long as you are not David Porter".