chthonian


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  • adj

Synonyms for chthonian

dwelling beneath the surface of the earth

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References in periodicals archive ?
As Joyce Zonana writes, "Thyrsis" imagines "a Chthonian apotheosis for Clough" (p.
Like the Furies in the Eumenides, the final play of The Oresteia, Olga's women become "the material and maternal embodiment of revenge" and are prepared to defy all social authority in order to punish those who have transgressed the Furies own, chthonian code of law (Roth 142).
She meets t he Invisible Man at the Chthonian bar--another reference pertaining to the gods and spirits of the underworld--and she summons him home with her "to join her in a very revolting ritual" (517), while he intends to use her to extract information about leaders of the Brotherhood to exact his revenge.
This obviously is a myth of origins, but there are no primitive, chthonian, or superhuman forces otherwise inexplicable.
Green is especially good at setting a gloomy or grim tone--as in his description of Brimo, "roarer and rearer,/Brimo, night wanderer, chthonian sovereign"--but he ranges across many moods in rendering this very moody poem.
The image, suggesting both the chthonian and the phallic, is especially appropriate for Meeks, another representation of the devil.
Tithonus' glimpse of the dark, chthonian world of birth and death precedes "the old mysterious glimmer" that now emanates from Aurora; the tonal convergence of "glimpse" and "glimmer" indicates that there is at least a conjunction between the two, if not a causal relation: there comes a glimpse, and then once more the old mysterious glimmer.
Even the chthonian alligator receives a man's body, retaining, however, the animal's characteristic penis, here aggressively ithyphallic (an alligator's virile member is normally neatly tucked away from view).
th CHTHonian eighth apoPHTHegm THin absinTHE caTHOlic
Meeting the narrator in the Chthonian, Ellison's Emma asks, "'But don't you think he should be a little blacker?
The dragon is a polymorphous predatory monster -- terrestrial, chthonian and heavenly: lion, scorpion, snake, winged, horned, bearded; he is mastered (a dominated or tamed beast) only by the goddess; the dragon and the goddess are the only mythological beings represented in round sculpture; their relation dominates the symbolic system of representations of the Oxus Civilization.
Such Christian thematics emphasize Bayard's attempt to replace the Chthonian values of the community with the only others he knows--those of Christianity and civil law.
In terms that strangely echo Perec's book, Barthes writes that the novel as practiced by Robbe-Grillet is no longer "of a chthonian, infernal nature, it is earthly; it teaches us to look at the world no longer through the eyes of the confessor, the physician or God - all of whom are revealing hypostases of the classical novelist - but through those of a man walking around the city, with no other horizon than what he sees, with no other power than the power of his eyes.