childhood

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  • noun

Synonyms for childhood

youth

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Synonyms for childhood

the state of a child between infancy and adolescence

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References in periodicals archive ?
A child bored with doing homework, depicted by Ravel (music) and Colette (libretto) in an opera, is explored, followed by a Malaysian young woman's memories of childhood learning classical piano in colonial Malaysia.
But it does provide food for thought about the importance of childhood in musical development.
CFS rates were highest for individuals who cited more than one type of childhood trauma and for those who endured especially severe ordeals, Heim's team says.
In some people, profound stress during childhood impairs the brain's responses to new challenges, the researchers propose.
His rich rendering of the complexity of childhood past demolishes the still-conventional sense that children have no history.
At every turn, they surprise--discussing the early extinction of childhood on the frontier, to take just one instance among dozens, Mintz sets before us two-year-olds who fetched oxen from the stock fields, five-year-olds who smoked cigarettes, nine-year-old girls who broke wild horses, and a boy of thirteen who headed the public library of Helena, Montana--and always they evoke the pathos and the poignancy of coming of age in America.
5-26: International conference and exhibition; Association for Childhood Education; Washington, D.
Mar 23-26: Conference: Association for Childhood Education International; Washington DC; www.
At 25, Gabriel Hadrian Guzman is using his art to capture the childhood he never had.
His abstract collection titled "Missing" portrays those years he missed, a fatherless only child whose mother frequently relived the horror of her own childhood.
The likelihood that a person will smoke as an adult goes up with exposure to these 'adverse childhood experiences,'" Felitti says.
These assumptions have become deeply embedded in a Western ideal of childhood that is increasingly broadcast through Western media and international agencies to the rest of the world.
During a stay at a psychiatric hospital following a bout of depression, Mel Gavigan recalls that her psychotherapist single-mindedly insisted she showed signs of having been sexually abused during childhood.
Evidence of this endurance is the ongoing Twayne's History of American Childhood Series and these two new volumes which Twayne has just issued.
What Moffitt dubs "life-course persistent antisocial behavior" begins in early childhood or even in the womb, in her view, with poorly understood forms of subtle brain damage that foster two major childhood problems: language difficulties that disrupt listening, reading, writing, and verbal memory; and the lack of attentiveness and self-control associated with the psychiatric condition known as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).