childhood

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  • noun

Synonyms for childhood

youth

Synonyms

Synonyms for childhood

the state of a child between infancy and adolescence

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Since many adults with CFS in the new studies didn't report childhood traumas or severe daily stress, the new findings don't support the controversial notion that CFS is a by-product of depression, comments psychologist Leonard A.
Others are distinctive to the history of childhood and to Mintz's conception of that history.
In the case of colonial childhood, for example, Mintz goes where the scholarship has gone and ends up advancing a singularly unpersuasive argument for the formative influence of Puritan child-rearing.
The standardization of such stages and the universalization of protected childhood were the ideals of the elite reformers we have come to call child savers.
19-22: Conference: European Acadamy of Childhood Disability; Monaco; http://www.
There's a red deflated balloon with a boy drawn on it, symbolizing the fleeting nature of childhood.
Photo (color in SAC edition only) Gabriel Guzman's "Missing" symbolizes the childhood he says he never had.
In this sense, the new history of children and childhood has come at a strategic moment as a necessary corrective to current popular fixations.
Neither migration nor childhood is an undifferentiated experience.
These two cases illustrate much of what animates current debate about whether long-submerged memories of childhood sexual abuse sometimes pop to the surface of consciousness after years or even decades.
Some researchers, steeped in the burgeoning psychological literature on the fragility of ordinary, everyday memories, look askance at increasing reports of people who enter psychotherapy and who then swiftly recall a childhood littered with sexual abuse.
In sorting the experiences of childhood between 1850 and 1890, Clement stresses the impact of industrialization and of the Civil War and Reconstruction on children's fates.
Neither one conveys a sense that the historical experience of childhood was important.
Early onset of menstruation sparked the most delinquency and emotional difficulties among girls who had displayed behavior problems throughout childhood, Caspi and Moffitt found.
Older students at coed schools, particularly boys, may demonstrate to younger girls the ways in which delinquency severs childhood apron strings and secures, at least from a teenage perspective, adult privileges, the researchers argue.