charity


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Related to charity: UNICEF, Charity begins at home
  • noun

Synonyms for charity

Synonyms for charity

Synonyms for charity

a foundation created to promote the public good (not for assistance to any particular individuals)

a kindly and lenient attitude toward people

an activity or gift that benefits the public at large

pinnate-leaved European perennial having bright blue or white flowers

an institution set up to provide help to the needy

References in classic literature ?
1821 the only officially supported charitable organization in New York City was the City Dispensary -- municipal aid to others having been cut off in 1817 on the grounds that charity to the poor only made them lazy and improvident}
Henly that, in consequence of his family's dining out, and his own engagements, he was fasting, and begged her charity for a meal.
Measure it off into three lots, one to be sold for charity, one for us, and one for the abbey.
There 's altogether too much fuss made about charity.
But if you, fair sir, out of your kind charity would be pleased to go a matter of two bow-shots out of your way, you would do me such a service as I could scarce repay.
I had become convinced that Ernest was right when he sneered at charity as a poulticing of an ulcer.
Having received the same into his hand, he asked whether they were all in charity with him, and without any enmity or rancour.
Her orders were indeed so liberal, that, had it been a child of her own, she could not have exceeded them; but, lest the virtuous reader may condemn her for showing too great regard to a base-born infant, to which all charity is condemned by law as irreligious, we think proper to observe that she concluded the whole with saying, "Since it was her brother's whim to adopt the little brat, she supposed little master must be treated with great tenderness.
He scorned the provisions made in the name of charity for the city's dependents.
Well, from early morning till dewy eve, when she had it out of him in the cold tub before putting him to bed, Charity and Tom were pitted against one another.
War and courage have done more great things than charity.
In the privacy of a four-wheeler, on her way to a charity cottage (one of a row) which by the exiguity of its dimensions and the simplicity of its accommodation, might well have been devised in kindness as a place of training for the still more straitened circumstances of the grave, she was forced to hid from her own child a blush of remorse and shame.
I cannot but think, with a view to the principle and its tendency to elevate or depress the character of the industrious classes, that a Public Charity is immeasurably better than a Private Foundation, no matter how munificently the latter may be endowed.
His preoccupied face so clearly denoted the pursuit in which he was engaged, that every cripple at the post-houses, not blind, who shoved his little battered tin-box in at the carriage window for Charity in the name of Heaven, Charity in the name of our Lady, Charity in the name of all the Saints, knew as well what work he was at, as their countryman Le Brun could have known it himself, though he had made that English traveller the subject of a special physiognomical treatise.
I was astonished at the sincerity and temper of this pious Papist, as much as I was oppressed by the power of his reasoning; and it presently occurred to my thoughts, that if such a temper was universal, we might be all Catholic Christians, whatever Church or particular profession we joined in; that a spirit of charity would soon work us all up into right principles; and as he thought that the like charity would make us all Catholics, so I told him I believed, had all the members of his Church the like moderation, they would soon all be Protestants.