charisma

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  • noun

Synonyms for charisma

Synonyms for charisma

Synonyms for charisma

a personal attractiveness or interestingness that enables you to influence others

References in periodicals archive ?
It is a charism that leads to freedom and liberation, to embrace critical and alternative lifestyles that challenge contemporary cultures and even the norms of religious institutions.
might argue that while any particular charism given in conjunction with
For FCS, this possibility rests in the "soul" of the profession, and for Catholic institutions of higher education this possibility is brought to fruition through the respective charism of the sponsoring institution.
Cook (2002) provides an additional description of this charism.
Evdokimov argues that, although the Virgin is depicted iconographically as head of the royal priesthood, the ministry of orders does not belong to woman's charism and that a woman cannot be a priest without betraying herself.
Calling for the development of new management models and forms of pastoral ministry, the reform leaders say these would allow parishioners to participate according to their charisms.
He examines possible Pentecostal contributions to current conversations between theology and science, mentioning glossolalia, the gift of tongues, a significant charism in Pentecostal theology, as a kind of leitmotiv for the diversity that could genuinely inform theological dialogues rooted in pneumatology.
Cabrini College, the only institution of higher education founded by Cabrini's order, continues to be inspired by her charism.
What is the charism of Catholic school education today?
Powell maintains, for example, that when the definition states that the pope possesses "that infallibility which the divine Redeemer willed his church to enjoy," this means that "[t]he church is preserved from error because of the charism of infallibility which resides in the papal office" (p.
Traditionally, a movement's charism is the means of holiness and service to the Church that distinguishes a movement from others within the Church.
Marie Therese assisted Adele as she worked to found the Daughters of Mary Immaculate, a religious order of women dedicated to implementing the Marianist charism.
The inaugural winners are: the Heartland Community Action Agency, Willmar, Minnesota; the North-Missoula Community Development Corporation, Missoula, Montana; CHARISM, Fargo, North Dakota; and The Lakota Fund, Kyle, South Dakota.
The various congregations of religious nuns, brothers and priests, are introduced with brief, but comprehensive information about their particular history and charism.
In terms of the routinization of charism, Massa interprets the conflict between IHM nuns and Cardinal Francis McIntyre of Los Angeles, from 1965 to 1970, as a charismatic disturbance, initiated ironically by Vatican II's call for religious to return to their founding charisms.